IONA

Research & Publications

Luke Brooks-Shesler, Ph.D.

Dr. Luke Brooks-Shesler is an assistant professor of Psychology. His research interests include creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship. He developed a dimensionalized measure of individual innovative performance, which describes the different ways that people can be innovative, and presented this work at the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology’s (SIOP) Annual Conference. In Research on Managing Groups and Teams: Creativity in Groups (Vol. 12), Dr. Brooks-Shesler co-authored a book chapter titled “Thinking Inside the Box: How Conformity Promotes Creativity and Innovation,” which explored the potential influence of conformity on group innovation. In April 2015, Dr. Brooks-Shesler presented a poster session at SIOP entitled The Moderating Effect of Social Exchange Relationships on Innovative Behaviors. Currently, Dr. Brooks-Shesler is working on a manuscript, tentatively titled “How Organizations Can Motivate Employees to Innovate: The Carrot or the Stick?” Dr. Brooks-Shesler's other current projects include measuring and predicting individual creative performance over time, the effect of collective efficacy on group innovative performance, and creating a career exploration tool based on person-organization fit.

Brian Cesario, Ph.D.

Dr. Brian Cesario is an assistant professor of Psychology. He has research interests in the areas of workplace violence and aggression, survey/questionnaire construction, and training program evaluation. His dissertation research, titled “Investigating the Consequences of Diffused Versus Targeted Workplace Sexual Harassment,” focused on the effect of diffusion and isolation of victims of workplace sexual harassment. He is currently expanding this research in a new study, in which he is investigating the effects of workplace contextual factors on victims’ and bystanders’ willingness to report sexually harassing behaviors to organizational authority figures. Dr. Cesario is also pilot testing a new scale designed to capture employees’ attitudes toward reporting sexual harassment.

Paul Greene, Ph.D.

Dr. Paul Greene is a professor of Psychology and a New York State licensed clinical psychologist. His interests include psychotherapy for individuals and couples, professional ethics, trauma, and disaster response. He has published in the areas of treatment, suicide prevention, trauma, and disaster response. Active in the New York State Psychological Association, he is on the Clinical Division’s Executive Board, and is the former editor of that division’s newsletter, Clinical Perspectives. He is a member of the Westchester County Psychological Association and chairs the Disaster Relief Committee. In 2013, The Academic Division of the New York State Psychological Association awarded him the David Mitchell Award for Outstanding Service to the New York State Psychological Association and to Academic and Community Psychology.

Oksana Huk, Psy.D.

Dr. Oksana Huk is an assistant professor of Psychology. She is a certified school psychologist in New York and New Jersey, and she is a member of the National Association of School Psychologists. Her research interests include resiliency, burnout/engagement, and practical applications of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy. Specifically, she is interested in research contributing to the field of school psychology with regards to building resiliency for victims of bullying. Additionally, she is interested in what factors contribute to burnout and engagement among teachers as well as how teachers' emotional well-being affects student performance.
 

Colleen Jacobson, Ph.D.

Dr. Colleen Jacobson is an assistant professor of Psychology and coordinator of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Studies Program. She is a New York State licensed psychologist and a member of the American Psychological Association, American Association for Cognitive and Behavioral Therapy, International Society for the Study of Self-injury, and the American Association of Suicidology. Dr. Jacobson’s research interests are related to risk factors for and treatment of non-suicidal self-injury and suicidal behaviors among adolescents and young adults. Over the course of the past three years, Dr. Jacobson has published five book chapters and research articles and presented at various national and international conferences on this topic. One empirical article, titled “The Association of Interpersonal and Intrapersonal Emotional Experiences with Non-suicidal Self-injury among Young Adults,” was published in Archives of Suicide Research, and includes an Iona alumna as a co-author. Another article, “The Measure of Verbally Expressed Emotion: Development and Psychometric Properties,” was published in the Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment. Another research article titled “Reasons for Attempting Suicide among a Community Sample of Adolescent Suicide Attempters” was published in the journal Suicide and Life Threatening Behaviors. She co-authored, with an Iona alumna, a book chapter titled “Epidemiology and Sociocultural Aspects of Non-suicidal Self-injury and Eating Disorders” in the book Non-Suicidal Self-injury in Eating Disorders.  Dr. Jacobson also co-authored the proposal to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders Task Force to include a diagnosis of Non-suicidal Self-injury Disorder in the DSM 5. The proposal received much attention and NSSI Disorder is included in Section 3 of the recently published DSM 5, a section devoted to diagnoses requiring further research.

Kisok Kim, Ph.D.

Dr. Kisok Kim is an associate professor of Psychology. Dr. Kim’s research interests include memory and decision processes, political psychology, and cross-cultural psychology. Dr. Kim’s recent research publications include “Three Regularities of Recognition Memory: The Role of Bias” (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review), “Liberal-Conservative Self Identification in Korea: A Cross-Cultural Explanation” (Korean Social Science Journal), and “Moral Intuitions and Political Orientation: Similarities and Differences between Korea and the United States,” (Psychological Reports). He has also co-authored and presented a poster titled “Cross-Cultural Analysis of Mortality Salience, Education, and Agreeableness Amongst the Politically Extreme” with his graduate students at the 2014 Meeting of The Society for Personality and Social Psychology in Austin, Texas. This research started as a project in his class and was extended and completed by students.

Patricia Oswald, Ph.D.

Dr. Patricia Oswald is chair and professor of Psychology, and director and internship coordinator for the graduate program in Industrial and Organizational Psychology. She is a New York State licensed psychologist and a member of the American Psychological Association, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, the Eastern Psychological Association, the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, and the Society for the Teaching of Psychology. Dr. Oswald's research interests include the areas of organizational issues related to gender-based stereotyping, work roles, and selection; empathy and helping behavior; and using technology to teach psychology. In the past three years, Dr. Oswald has published a textbook and three research articles, and has presented several of these papers at professional conferences. Her book, Statistics and Research Methods: Introductory and Advanced Concepts, has been used as the required text for advanced undergraduate and graduate statistics courses. In 2015 at the 30th Annual Conference of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP), Dr. Oswald presented research that she completed in collaboration with an  I-O graduate student, “Employee Selection: Implications of Self-promotion, Immigrant Status, and Vacancy Length.” At the Annual Conferences on the Teaching of Psychology (2012-2015), she presented two papers related to teaching research methods, "Development of an Institutional Review Board Process for Student Research Projects" and "Infusing Psychology Courses with Professional Level Experiences," and a paper on preparing students for future careers, “What’s Next: Preparing Students for Life Following Graduation.” These papers have also been published in ERIC Digests. Dr. Oswald is currently collaborating with graduate students to investigate the role of leadership styles and gender of leader on employee trust and motivation.

OJ Sizemore, Ph.D.

Dr. OJ Sizemore is an associate professor of Psychology. He is a member of the Eastern Psychological Association. Dr. Sizemore's research has focused on topics within the areas of social psychology and the teaching of psychology. In the past three years he has three articles published in peer-reviewed journals and nine presentations and posters at academic conferences (six of these included students). His article titled "The Role of Perpetrator Motivation in Two Crime Scenarios" was published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, while his article "Lesson Learned: Using Clinical Examples for Teaching Research Methods" appeared in the British journal Psychology Teaching and Learning. Along with student Lisa Chevernak, he presented research titled "Weight Stigma:  How You Lose it Matters" at the Annual Convention of the Eastern Psychological Association; at the Annual Conference on the Teaching of Psychology he reported his study titled "Grade Inflation: Academia’s Weather?"

John L. Theodore, Ph.D.

Dr. John L. Theodore is an associate professor of Psychology, and director and internship coordinator for the graduate program in Mental Health Counseling. He is a New York State licensed psychologist. Dr. Theodore is also a member of the American Psychological Association, the New York Mental Health Counselors Association, and the Westchester Chapter of the New York Mental Health Counselors Association. His research interests include public health, infectious diseases, sexual risk-taking behavior, depression, and diversity groups. He has recently collaborated with research faculty at Mt. Sinai Medical Center. In the past three years, Dr. Theodore has published in peer-reviewed journals (Journal of Homosexuality, and Psychology Learning and Teaching), an electronic library (ERIC), and a newsletter for a professional society (NYMHCA Quarterly). He has also delivered professional presentations at multiple scientific and educational conventions. Examples of his publications in 2015 include “Teaching Clinical Treatment and Client Negotiation Skills via Role-Play” in ERIC Digests, and two reports for “Westchester Chapter Update” in NYMHCA Quarterly.  Examples in 2015 of his conference presentations include “Gay-Affirmative Counseling and Changes in Depression among Men with Internalized Homophobia” presented at the 123rd Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, and “Teaching SOAP and DAP Note Construction via Clinical Role Play” presented at the 29th Annual Conference on the Teaching of Psychology.  

Katherine Zaromatidis, Ph.D.

Dr. Katherine Zaromatidis is an associate professor of Psychology, and director of the graduate program in School Psychology. She is a New York State licensed psychologist and a permanently certified New York State school psychologist. She is a member of the National Association of School Psychologists and serves as a reviewer for the NASP Program Approval Board. Dr. Zaromatidis’ recent research has focused on topics within the areas of the teaching of psychology. At the Annual Conferences on the Teaching of Psychology (2012-2015), she presented two papers related to teaching research methods, "Development of an Institutional Review Board Process for Student Research Projects" and "Infusing Psychology Courses with Professional Level Experiences," and a paper on preparing students for future careers, “What’s Next: Preparing Students for Life Following Graduation.” These papers have also been published in ERIC Digests. Furthermore, Dr. Zaromatidis is interested in the use of interdisciplinary techniques to improve professional training. She has presented a paper at New York State Council for Exceptional Children ("Teaching Side by Side:  Educators and Psychologists Collaborate to Improve Teacher Pedagogy") and a paper at the Teacher Education Division of the Council for Exceptional Children ("Using Visual Media to Enhance Teacher and School Psychology Candidates’ Dispositions"), which focus on the use of interdisciplinary techniques to improve student learning in school psychology and teacher preparation programs.