IONA

Research & Publications

Faculty Accomplishments

Shaki Asgari, Ph.D.

Dr. Shaki Asgari is an Assistant Professor of Psychology. She is a social psychologist whose research focuses on the influence of social categorizations (e.g., race, social class, gender) on individuals’ self-perception and inter-group evaluations. Dr. Asgari's most recent presentations include:  "Double Jeopardy: The Conjunctive Influence of Social Class and Race on Evaluation of College Applicants’ Success in Highly Selective Universities" (presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Association for Psychological Science and the 2013 Annual Hunter College Psychology Convention) and "To Be an Immigrant: Psychosocial Experiences of Unauthorized Eastern European Immigrants Living in The United States" (presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting of The Eastern Psychological Association). These studies were completed with student collaborators. Dr. Asgari's most recent publication, "When Do Counterstereotypic Ingroup Members Inspire vs. Deflate? The Effect of Successful Role Models on Women’s Leadership Self-Concept," appears in the journal Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (2012).

Paul Greene, Ph.D.

Dr. Paul Greene is a Professor of Psychology and a New York State licensed clinical psychologist. His interests include psychotherapy for individuals and couples, professional ethics, trauma, and disaster response. He has published in the areas of treatment, suicide prevention, trauma, and disaster response. Active in the New York State Psychological Association, he is on the Clinical Division’s Executive Board, and is the former editor of that division’s newsletter, Clinical Perspectives. He is a member of the Westchester County Psychological Association and chairs the Disaster Relief Committee. In 2013, The Academic Division of the New York State Psychological Association awarded him the David Mitchell Award for Outstanding Service to the New York State Psychological Association and to Academic and Community Psychology.

Colleen Jacobson, Ph.D.

Dr. Colleen Jacobson is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Coordinator of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Studies Program.  She is a New York State licensed psychologist and a member of the American Psychological Association, American Association for Cognitive and Behavioral Therapy, International Society for the Study of Self-injury, Eastern Psychological Association, American Association of Suicidology, American Counseling Association, and American Mental Health Counselors Association.  Dr. Jacobson’s research interests are related to risk factors for and treatment of non-suicidal self-injurious behaviors and suicidal behaviors among adolescents and young adults.  Over the course of the past three years, Dr. Jacobson has published six book chapters and research articles and presented at various national and international conferences on this topic.  One case study titled “Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents Adapted for Self-injury (IPT-ASI): Rationale, Overview, and Case Summary” was published in the American Journal of Psychotherapy.  Another research article titled “Reasons for Attempting Suicide among a Community Sample of Adolescent Suicide Attempters” was published in the journal Suicide and Life Threatening Behaviors.  She also         co-authored a book chapter titled, “Epidemiology and Sociocultural Aspects of Non-suicidal Self-injury and Eating Disorders” to be included in the upcoming book Non-Suicidal Self-injury in Eating Disorders with a graduate student, Cindy Luik.  Dr. Jacobson also co-authored the proposal to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders Task Force to include a diagnosis of Non-suicidal Self-injury Disorder in the DSM V.  The proposal received much attention and NSSI Disorder is included in Section 3 of the recently published DSM V, a section devoted to diagnoses requiring further research.

Kisok Kim, Ph.D.

Dr. Kisok Kim is an Associate Professor of Psychology. Dr. Kim’s research interests include memory and decision processes, political psychology, and cross-cultural psychology. Dr. Kim’s recent research publications and presentations include a paper titled “Cross-Cultural Analysis of Mortality Salience, Education, and Agreeableness Amongst the Politically Extreme.” This research was completed with graduate students and has been accepted for a poster presentation at the 2014 meeting of The Society for Personality and Social Psychology in Austin, Texas.  Dr. Kim co-authored a paper titled “Moral Intuitions and Political Orientation: Similarities and Differences between Korea and the United States,” which was published in 2012 in Psychological Reports. In 2011, Dr. Kim co-authored “Differences and Changes in Paranormal Beliefs in University Students from South Korea and the United States,” which was published in the Korean Social Science Journal.  In addition, three co-authored papers have been submitted for publication and are currently under review: “Cross-Cultural Validity of Explanations of Political Orientation,” “sdtfit: Software for Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Signal Detection Theory Parameters,” and “Three Regularities of Recognition Memory: The Role of Bias.”

Patricia Oswald, Ph.D.

Dr. Patricia Oswald is Chair and Professor of Psychology, and Director and Internship Coordinator for the graduate program in Industrial and Organizational Psychology. She is a New York State licensed psychologist and a member of the American Psychological Association, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, the Eastern Psychological Association, and the New England Psychological Association. Dr. Oswald's research interests include the areas of empathy and helping behavior; organizational issues related to gender-based stereotyping, work roles, and selection; and using technology to teach psychology. In the past three years, Dr. Oswald has published a textbook and four research articles, and has presented several of these papers at professional conferences. Her book, Statistics and Research Methods: Introductory and Advanced Concepts, has been used as the required text for advanced undergraduate and graduate level statistics courses. At the Annual Conferences on the Teaching of Psychology (2010-2013), she has presented two papers on assessment of student learning outcomes, "Assessing Student Learning Outcomes in the Psychology Major" and "Using Introductory Psychology Courses to Measure Institutional Core Curriculum Goals," and two papers related to teaching research methods, "Development of an Institutional Review Board Process for Student Research Projects" and "Infusing Psychology Courses with Professional Level Experiences." These papers have also been published in ERIC Digests. Dr. Oswald is currently collaborating with graduate students to investigate the role of self-promotion and immigrant status on employment selection; and the role of leadership styles and gender of leader on employee trust and motivation.

OJ Sizemore, Ph.D.

Dr. OJ Sizemore is an Associate Professor of Psychology. He is a member of the Eastern Psychological Association. Dr. Sizemore's research has focused on topics within the areas of social psychology and the teaching of psychology.  In the past three years he has three articles published in peer-reviewed journals and nine presentations and posters at academic conferences (six of these included students).  His article titled "The Role of Perpetrator Motivation in Two Crime Scenarios" was published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, while his article "Lesson Learned: Using Clinical Examples for Teaching Research Methods" appeared in the British journal Psychology Teaching and Learning.  Along with student Lisa Chevernak, he presented research titled "Weight Stigma:  How You Lose it Matters" at the Annual Convention of the Eastern Psychological Association; at the Annual Conference on the Teaching of Psychology he reported his study titled "Grade Inflation: Academia’s Weather?"

John L. Theodore, Ph.D.

Dr. John L. Theodore is an Assistant Professor of Psychology, and Director and Internship Coordinator for the graduate program in Mental Health Counseling.  He is a New York State licensed psychologist and a member of the American Counseling Association, American Psychological Association, American Mental Health Counselors Association, Eastern Psychological Association, and New York Mental Health Counselors Association.  Dr. Theodore is also the Co-Coordinator of the Westchester Chapter of the New York Mental Health Counselors Association.  Dr. Theodore's research interests include public health, infectious diseases, sexual risk-taking behavior, depression, and diversity groups.  He has recently collaborated with research faculty at Mt. Sinai Medical Center and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Dr. Theodore's recent publications include "Psychometrics of an Internalized Homophobia Instrument for Men" and "Teaching Clinical Skills to Psychology Students via         Role-Play;" these articles have appeared in peer-reviewed journals such as Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Journal of Homosexuality, and Psychology Leaning and Teaching.  His other publications, including abstracts, have appeared in electronic sources such as ERIC Digests and the International AIDS Society (IAS).  He has recently co-authored multiple electronic publications in the New York Mental Health Counselors Association Newsletter and has presented scholarly papers at the 118th and 120th Annual Conventions of the American Psychological Association, 84th Annual Convention of the Eastern Psychological Association, XVIII International AIDS Conference, and the 3rd and 4th Vancouver International Conferences on the Teaching of Psychology.  Dr. Theodore routinely involves Iona students in his research activities, several of which have led to student co-authorship on presentations and publications.

Katherine Zaromatidis, Ph.D.

Dr. Katherine Zaromatidis is an Associate Professor of Psychology, and Director of the graduate program in School Psychology. She is a New York State licensed psychologist and a permanently certified New York State school psychologist.  She is a member of the National Association of School Psychologists and the American Psychological Association.  Dr. Zaromatidis’ recent research has focused on topics within the areas of the teaching of psychology.  At the Annual Conferences on the Teaching of Psychology (2010-2013), she has presented two papers on assessment of student learning ("Assessing Student Learning Outcomes in the Psychology Major" and "Using Introductory Psychology Courses to Measure Institutional Core Curriculum Goals") and two papers related to teaching research methods ("Development of an Institutional Review Board Process for Student Research Projects" and "Infusing Psychology Courses with Professional Level Experiences"). These papers have also been published in ERIC Digests. Furthermore, Dr. Zaromatidis will be presenting a paper at New York State Council for Exceptional Children ("Teaching Side by Side:  Educators and Psychologists Collaborate to Improve Teacher Pedagogy"), and a paper at the Teacher Education Division of the Council for Exceptional Children ("Using Visual Media to Enhance Teacher and School Psychology Candidates’ Dispositions"), which focuses on the use of interdisciplinary techniques to improve student learning.