Iona College Editorial Style Guide

For questions about the style guide, please contact College Marketing & Communications at insideiona@iona.edu or (914) 633-2476.

Iona College’s editorial style guide is a modified version of Associated Press (AP) style. This style guide should be referenced when writing text (copy) for publications (print and electronic) for distribution to internal and external constituents. The most important aspect is to remain consistent in usage of various terms (titles, times, dates, places, etc.) within your document.

A unified style strengthens Iona’s image (brand) with prospective students and parents, alumni and donors.

Common Style Mistakes | Full Editorial Style Guide


Quick Reference – Common Mistakes

time

Times should be expressed with numerals, and using periods for a.m. and p.m. Times on the hour should not use zeros. Use noon, not 12:00 p.m. or 12 noon; midnight, not 12:00 a.m. or 12 midnight.

dates

The preferred date format is: Month (spelled out) Date, Year. When a date is listed within a sentence, a comma should be used after the date before continuing the sentence.

Please respond by October 1, 2014, to Jane Smith.

For dates, do not use cardinal numbers

October 1, not October 1st.

phone numbers

In text, place the area code in parentheses and use a hyphen in between the rest of the number.

(914) 633-2000

Academic Degrees

Use periods when abbreviating degrees only if they contain both uppercase and lowercase letters. Do not use periods for BA, BBA, BS, MA, MS, MFA, MD, etc.

Jane Smith, MS
John Smith, Ph.D., M.Ed.

Academic Departments

The official name of Iona academic departments are simply the subject and the word “department.” Do not use “Department of.”

English Department; Social Work Department

alumni/alumnus/alumnae/alumna

A man is an alumnus; a woman is an alumna. Several men or a group of men and women are alumni; several women are alumnae. Do not use the informal “alum.”

titled/entitled

Titled is the name or title of something; entitled is the right to do or have something.

The article was titled “The Practicality of Writing Prompts in Freshman-Level Math Courses.”
His executive position entitled him to certain courtesies rarely accorded others.

exclamation point

Use the mark to express a high degree of surprise, incredulity or other strong emotion. Avoid overuse.


Full Editorial Style Guide

Academic Buildings

See “Campus Locations & Names

Academic Degrees

Use periods when abbreviating degrees only if they contain both uppercase and lowercase letters.

John Smith, Ph.D., M.Ed.

Do not use periods for BA, BBA, BS, MA, MS, MFA, MD, etc.

According to AP, use associate degree.

Academic degrees and honors are capitalized; a generic reference to a degree is not.

There is no “’s” after Bachelor or Master when referring to the academic degree. There is an “’s” when a generic reference is used.

Bachelor of Science, Master of Education
bachelor’s degree in chemistry, master’s degree in education

No space is needed between the class year and degree.

John Smith ’89MA

If a person has multiple degrees from Iona, they are separated by commas and each degree is listed.

Jane Smith ’92, ’95MA
John Doe ’97, ’99MST, ’04MBA

It is Iona College style to list only terminal degrees after an individual’s name when establishing credentials. A terminal degree is generally accepted as the highest degree in a field of study.

John Smith, Ph.D.
Jane Doe, Ed.D.
Sam Smith, MFA

For individuals who received their terminal degree from a different institution but also have an Iona class year, use a comma to separate the terminal degree and class year. This also applies to individuals who have other credentials that are not associated with their Iona degree.

John Smith, Ph.D., ’62
Jane Doe, CCC-SLP, ’84

For individuals who are not Iona College alumni and therefore do not have a class year after their name only a terminal degree is listed.

John Doe, Ph.D.

Academic Departments

The official name of Iona academic departments are simply the subject and the word “department,” e.g., English Department, Social Work Department. As proper names, these are capitalized.

School of Arts & Science (Note: use ampersand rather than “and”)
School of Business

Iona College – School of Arts & Science Departments:

  • Biology Department
  • Chemistry Department
  • Computer Science Department
  • Criminal Justice Department
  • Economics Department
  • Education Department
  • English Department
  • Environmental Studies Department
  • Fine and Performing Arts Department
  • Foreign Languages Department
  • History Department
  • International Studies Department
  • Marriage and Family Therapy Department
  • Mass Communication Department
  • Mathematics Department
  • Peace and Justice Department
  • Philosophy Department
  • Physics Department
  • Political Science Department
  • Psychology Department
  • Religious Studies Department
  • Scientific and Technological Literacy Department
  • Social Work Department
  • Sociology Department
  • Speech Communication Studies Department
  • Women’s Studies Department

Iona College – School of Business Departments:

  • Accounting Department
  • Finance, Business Economics & Legal Studies Department
  • Information Systems Department
  • Management, Business Administration & Health Care Management Department
  • Marketing & International Business Department

Academic Titles

See “titles

accept, except 

Accept is to receive; except is with the exclusion of.

acronyms, abbreviations

Use acronyms only after the full name has been used on first reference. Acronym or abbreviation should be included in parentheses after the first reference for the reader.

Learning in Retirement at Iona College (LIRIC) serves the intellectual and social needs of a vibrant community of lifelong learners. LIRIC will hold an open house next week. 

Do not use periods in acronyms unless they are part of an official title.

addresses

In content, a numbered address should use the abbreviations: Ave., Blvd., St. Do not abbreviate others, such as Road or Circle.

On formal invitations or publications, spelling out Avenue, Boulevard and Street is acceptable.

Administrative Departments

  • Advancement & External Affairs
  • Athletics Department
  • College Marketing and Communications
  • Office of Academic Civic & Global Engagement
  • Office of Admissions
  • Office of Campus Safety and Security
  • Office of Conference Services
  • Office of Enrollment Management
  • Office of Facilities Management
  • Finance and Administration Office
  • Office for Human Resources
  • Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Planning
  • Office of Mission and Ministry
  • Office of Off-Campus Housing
  • Office of Student Development (not Office of Student Life)
  • Office of Student Financial Services
  • Office of Student Success
  • Office of the Ombudsperson
  • Office of the President
  • Office of the Provost
  • Student Financial Services

adviser (not advisor)

affect, effect

Affect is to have an influence on; effect is something brought about by a cause.

African-American

ages

See “numbers

all right (never alright)

alma mater

alumni/alumnus/alumnae/alumna

A man is an alumnus; a woman is an alumna. Several men or a group of men and women are alumni; several women are alumnae.

Do not use the informal “alum.”

annual

Never say “first annual.” An event cannot be annual until it has occurred at least twice. Use inaugural or first-ever.

backward (not backwards)

basement

Use “lower level” instead.

biannually/bimonthly/biweekly

Do not hyphenate. Biannually is every other year; bimonthly is every other month; biweekly is every other week.

Biennially is every two years.
Semiannual, semimonthly and semiweekly mean twice a year/month/week.

Blessed Edmund Rice

board of trustees

Lowercase on references, except when referring specifically to Iona College Board of Trustees.

book/periodical titles

Book titles are always italicized. Magazines, periodicals and newspaper names are also italicized.

Titles of articles and speeches are written within “quotation marks.” Include punctuation including commas and periods within quotation marks, not after. If a question mark is part of a quote, it should be within quotation marks; if it’s not part of the quote, outside.  Colons and semicolons are always outside the quotation marks.

campus

Always lowercase.

campuswide

One word, no hyphen.

Campus Locations & Names

When referencing a location on-campus that is within another, indicate this by listing both locations with a comma between.

Thomas J. Burke Lounge, Spellman Hall
LaPenta-Lynch Trading Floor, Hagan Hall

Academic Buildings/Centers, Campus Locations

  • 800 Room – Located in Ryan Library
  • Admissions Welcome Center – Located in McSpedon Hall
  • Amend Hall
  • Arrigoni Center
  • Blessed Edmund Rice Chapel
  • Br. Kenneth Chapman Gallery – Located in the Iona College Arts Center
  • Center for Financial Market Studies – Within Hagan School of Business
  • Christopher J. Murphy Auditorium
  • Columba Lot – Parking lot located behind Cornelia Hall
  • Cornelia Hall
  • DeSantis Alumni House – Located at 33 Pryer Terrace, along with Joyce Advancement House.
  • Doorley Hall
  • Dr. Patrick J. Martin Learning and Resource Center – Located in Ryan Library
  • Driscoll Hall
  • East Hall Hill
  • Egan Hall
  • Faculty Reception Room – Located in Spellman Hall
  • Faculty Lounge – Located in Spellman Hall
  • Foreign Language Laboratory – Located in Doorley Hall
  • ginkgo tree (not gingko)
  • Hagan Hall
  • Helen T. Arrigoni Library/Technology Center – Part of “The Murphy Center”
  • Iona Wellness Center
  • International Center – Located in Driscoll Hall
  • Iona College Arts Center
  • Joyce Advancement House – Located at 33 Pryer Terrace, along with DeSantis Alumni House.
  • LaPenta Marketplace – Dining facility located in LaPenta Student Union
  • LaPenta-Lynch Trading Floor – Located in Hagan Hall. Note hyphen.
  • Mass Communication Media Laboratory – Located in the Murphy Center
  • Mass Communication Television Studio – Located in the Murphy Center
  • McGrath Room – Located in LaPenta Student Union
  • McSpedon Hall
  • Memorial Park – Located at the entrance to Ryan Library. Location of Iona’s September 11 Memorial.
  • Montgomery Lot – Parking lot located at the campus entrance from Montgomery Place.
  • Murphy Center
  • Parents Plaza – Located between Conese Hall and South Hall
  • Rice Oval
  • Robert V. LaPenta Student Union (first reference) – LaPenta Student Union is acceptable in repeated references. 
  • Rockland Graduate Center
  • Romita Auditorium – Located in Ryan Library
  • Samuel Rudin Academic Resource Center – Located in Amend Hall
  • Speech, Language & Hearing Clinic – Located at Holy Family Church
  • Spellman Hall
  • St. Columba
  • Summit Avenue Lot – Parking lot located on Summit Avenue, behind the Arrigoni Center.
  • The Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching (CELTIC) (first reference) – CELTIC is acceptable in repeated references.
  • The End Zone – Located in LaPenta Student Union.
  • The Gerri Ripp Center for Career Development – Located in Spellman Hall.
  • The Lynch Pavilion – Located in Ryan Library.
  • The Vitanza Dining Commons – Dining facility located in Spellman Hall.
  • Thomas J. Burke Lounge (first reference) – Burke Lounge is acceptable in repeated references. Located in Spellman Hall.
  • Walsh Hall

Residence Halls

  • Conese Hall
  • East Hall
  • Eastchester Apartments
  • Hales Hall (formerly South Hall)
  • Loftus Hall
  • North Avenue Residence Hall
  • Rice Hall

Athletic Facilities

  • Donald E. Walsh Field at Rice Oval
  • Glen Island Harbour Club – Located along the waterfront area of New Rochelle. Official boathouse for Iona’s men’s and women’s rowing teams.
  • Hegarty Room – Located in Hynes Athletics Center
  • Hynes Athletics Center
  • Hynes Athletics Center Cardiovascular Center – Located in Hynes Athletics Center
  • Hynes Athletics Center Pool – Located in Hynes Athletics Center
  • Hynes Athletics Center Rowing Tank – Located in Hynes Athletics Center
  • John A. Mulcahy Gymnasium (first reference) – Mulcahy Gymnasium is acceptable in repeated references. Located in Hynes Athletics Center
  • Mazzella Field
  • William “Brud” Flowers Park – Also called “City Park”. Home of Iona’s men’s baseball team.

campuses

New Rochelle – Main campus of Iona College.
Rockland Graduate Center – Located in Pearl River, N.Y.
Rockefeller Center – Location offering some Iona Public Relations graduate courses.

capitalization

Proper nouns, proper names, popular names and derivative nouns that rely on a proper noun for their meaning (e.g., “Christianity”) merit capitalization, as do specific names of individuals, organizations and holidays. Consult the AP Stylebook for additional information.

century

Always lowercase.

20th century

class years

When listing names and class year, there is no comma separation between them. Make sure to use an apostrophe (’84), not a single opening quote (‘84).

John A. Smith ’84

Designations after names belong before the class year, with commas preceding and following the title.

Joseph E. Todd, Esq., ’78

There is no space between a class year and an advanced degree, but they must be separated from the previous class year with a comma and a space. Use graduation year in Iona publications only if the degrees were earned from Iona.

William Baldwin ’45, ’48MBA

To make a year plural, do not use an apostrophe between the year and the “s”:

1990s
in the ’60s
class reunion for years ending in 2s and 7s

college

Uppercase when specifically referring to Iona College; lowercase when generalizing.

John Smith has worked at the College for 20 years.
She went off to college.

College & Student Publications

  • Iona College Magazine
    Iona College’s general interest publication highlighting news of the College as well as of its alumni, faculty and students.
  • The Shakespeare Newsletter
  • The Ionian
    Iona College’s official student-run newspaper.
  • ICANN
    Iona College Annual is an official Iona College yearbook, which is produced annually by a student-run organization.

College Programs & Resources

  • NSF S-STEM: Iona Development of Excellence in Science through Intervention, Resilience, and Enrichment (DESIRE) Program
  • Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program (CStep)
  • Iona in Mission
  • Student Leadership Resource Center (SLRC)
  • Learning in Retirement at Iona College (LIRIC)
  • Iona College Council on the Arts
  • Institute for Thomas Paine Studies
  • Hynes Institute for Entrepreneurship & Innovation
  • Center for Advising and Academic Services

commencement

Capitalize when referring specifically to Iona’s ceremony, otherwise lowercase.

community

When referencing the College community, do not capitalize.

The Iona College Council on the Arts is dedicated to sponsoring artistic and cultural programs for the enrichment of the Iona College community.

course work

cum laude, magna cum laude, summa cum laude

curricula, curriculum

Curricula is plural; Curriculum is singular.

dates

The preferred date format is: Month (spelled out) Date, Year

The gala will take place on December 5, 2015.

When a date is listed within a sentence, a comma should be used after the date before continuing the sentence.

On Monday, December 8, Iona College will be closed due to inclement weather.
Please respond by October 1, 2014, to Jane Smith.

dean’s list

Lowercase and possessive.

decades

See “class years

despise

dorm, dormitory

Use “residence hall” instead.

effect, affect

See “affect, effect

email

Hyphen is no longer necessary.

email addresses
Email addresses are always lowercase.
alumni@iona.edu

employee (not employe)

emerita, emeritus, emeriti

Emerita is used to denote a retired female professor.
Emeritus is used to denote a male retired professor.
Emeriti is a group of retired professors

ensure, insure

Ensure means guarantee; insure refers to an insurance policy.

entitled, titled

See “titled, entitled

except, accept 

See “accept, except

farther, further

Farther is physical distance; further is an extension of time or degree.

fundraiser, fundraising

When used, should be consistent throughout the piece.

freshman, freshmen

“Use the singular (“freshman”) when referring to an individual or the whole class; “freshmen” is the plural noun.

I, me

I is used as a subjective pronoun. Me is used as an objective pronoun. This means that it functions as an object in a sentence.

Ashley went to lunch with Molly and me.
NOT: Ashley went to lunch with Molly and I.

Quick tip:
If you’re still not sure which to use, remove the other person/object from the sentence and see if the sentence still makes sense.

John joined Jenny and me for dinner. (John joined me for dinner; NOT: John joined I for dinner)
Jenny and I joined John for dinner. (I joined John for dinner; NOT: Me joined John for dinner)

insure, ensure

See “ensure, insure

Internet

Terms such as “the Internet,” “the Web” and “the World Wide Web” sound dated in general usage. When possible, use the term “online.”

it’s, its

“It’s” is the contraction meaning “it is”; “its” is the possessive pronoun.

Jr.

There is no comma used after a name when listing someone who is a Jr.

William Strunk Jr.

Maroon & Gold

In athletics, used only after a first reference to a team, along with Gaels.

Mass Communication

No “s” on the end of Communication.

multimedia

Nasdaq

nonprofit

numbers

In general, spell out the numbers zero through nine. Use numerals (10, 11, 12, etc.) for 10 and above. An exception to this is in headlines – use numerals for all, but do not use a numeral to begin a sentence.

Jane Smith has been a member of the Iona community for five years.
John Doe has worked for Iona for 27 years.

For ordinals, spell out first through ninth. Use numerals for 10 and above (10th, 25th, etc.)

John Smith was third in line for concert tickets.
You are invited to the 22nd Annual Gala.

Measurements, GPAs and ages should always be represented by numerals.

The dog jumped over the 3-foot fence.
John Doe graduated with a 4.0 GPA.
Jane Smith is a 5-year-old girl.

For percentages, spell out the word in text. The “%” sign may be used in numerical charts and headlines.

The budget increased 13 percent from the previous year.

offseason

online

phone numbers

In text, place the area code in parentheses and use a hyphen in between the rest of the number.

(914) 633-2000

For Iona College business cards, letterhead and email signatures, periods are used to separate the number.

914.633.2000

playwright

pope

Capitalize only when used as a formal title before a name, otherwise lowercase.

Pope Francis is preparing to visit France.
The pope is the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.

Presidents Day

professor

Capitalize professor before an individual’s name, lowercase when used after or with a generic reference. Also capitalize when part of a formal title.

Professor Jane Doe teaches undergraduate courses.
Jane Doe, professor of English, has worked at Iona College for five years.
Jane Doe is a professor at Iona.
Jane Doe is the Rudin Driscoll Visiting Professor.

repetition

resident assistant

On first reference “resident assistant (RA); RA is acceptable in repeated references.

RSVP

The abbreviation for the French “respondez s’il vous plait,” meaning “please reply.” Use without periods in all instances, and do not use “please” with it.

To attend the gala, RSVP to events@iona.edu.

sacrilegious

spring break

stationary, stationery

Stationary is not moving; stationery is writing paper.

symposia, symposium

Symposia is plural; Symposium is singular.

Sr.

There is no comma used when listing someone who is a Sr.

William Strunk Sr.

states

Names of all 50 states should be spelled out in full when they stand alone in text.

When the state name is used in conjunction with a city/town/village in text, it should be abbreviated using the below list – different than using postal codes. These abbreviations reflect former AP Style guidelines. While AP Style no longer abbreviates states, Iona College continues to abbreviate.

John Smith is a current resident of New Rochelle, N.Y., and a former resident of Nashville, Tenn.

Eight states are always spelled out in text – Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Ohio, Texas and Utah.

  • Alabama – Ala.
  • Arizona – Ariz.
  • Arkansas – Ark.
  • California – Calif.
  • Colorado – Colo.
  • Connecticut – Conn.
  • Delaware – Del.
  • Florida – Fla.
  • Georgia – Ga.
  • Illinois – Ill.
  • Indiana – Ind.
  • Kansas – Kan.
  • Kentucky – Ky.
  • Louisiana – La.
  • Maryland – Md.
  • Massachusetts – Mass.
  • Michigan – Mich.
  • Minnesota – Minn.
  • Mississippi – Miss.
  • Missouri – Mo.
  • Montana – Mont.
  • Nebraska – Neb.
  • Nevada – Nev.
  • New Hampshire – N.H.
  • New Jersey – N.J.
  • New Mexico – N.M.
  • New York – N.Y.
  • North Carolina – N.C.
  • North Dakota – N.D.
  • Oklahoma – Okla.
  • Oregon – Ore.
  • Pennsylvania – Pa.
  • Rhode Island – R.I.
  • South Carolina – S.C.
  • South Dakota – S.D.
  • Tennessee – Tenn.
  • Vermont – Vt.
  • Virginia – Va.
  • Washington – Wash.
  • West Virginia – W.Va.
  • Wisconsin – Wis.
  • Wyoming – Wyo.

Postal codes should only be used when the state is reference within an “address block” – full address with ZIP code, including the eight states that are not abbreviated in text.

Anchorage Public Library
1 Main Street
Anchorage, AK 12345

that, which

That defines and restricts;  which does not. The use of “that” does not require a comma, the use of “which” does.

The story that was printed last night was inaccurate; this morning’s version is correct.
The story, which appeared on the front page, was inaccurate.

theater/theatre

Iona preference is “theatre” when referring to the arts.

Exception is if “theater” is part of an official name, such as The Theater at Madison Square Garden.

time

Times should be expressed with numerals, and those times on the hour should have the zeros eliminated.

Jane Smith delivered her third child at 3:42 p.m.
The meeting will begin at 3 p.m.

Periods are used for a.m. and p.m.

Official invitations might opt for more formal use of times, including such phrases as four o’clock in the afternoon. Use noon, not 12:00 p.m. or 12 noon; midnight, not 12:00 a.m. or 12 midnight.

titled/entitled

Titled is the name or title of something; entitled is the right to do or have something.

The article was titled “The Practicality of Writing Prompts in Freshman-Level Math Courses.”
His executive position entitled him to certain courtesies rarely accorded others.

titles

Capitalize job titles before an individual’s name, lowercase the title afterward. Avoid the use of a long title before a name.

President Joseph E. Nyre, Ph.D., or Dr. Joseph Nyre, president.

When referencing an individual by title and department, lowercase the title but use appropriate capitalization of the department name.

John Smith, director of Alumni Relations

It is important to note that the capitalization of a job title does not accrue additional significance to the position; just as lowercasing the title does not diminish its significance. Indeed, the president of the United States is subject to the same stylistic rules as the rest of us.

For religious orders and doctorate degrees, upon first reference use the designated abbreviation after the full name, and follow the abbreviation with a comma: John Smith, CFC; John Doe, Ph.D. Thereafter, reference will be: Br. Jones; Dr. Doe

Courtesy titles (Ms., Mrs., Mr.) are not needed, unless part of a direct quote or if they have been specifically requested by the individual. Refer to both women and man by first and last name without courtesy titles.

Do not use “Dr.” and “Ph.D.” in the same reference. It is either one or the other. Iona preference is to use “, Ph.D.” on first reference and “Dr.” on subsequent references.

Iona College’s president is Joseph E. Nyre, Ph.D. Dr. Nyre is the eighth president of the College. 

Do not use “Brother” and “,CFC” in the same reference. It is either one or the other as CFC designates Congregation of Christian Brothers.

Brother Jason Ford
Jason Ford, CFC

toward (not towards)

trademark

traveled (not travelled)

T-shirt

Veterans Day

web addresses

URLs are always lowercase, and do not use the prefix “http://”.

www.iona.edu

web browser

Use web browser rather than Internet browser.

website

Now commonly used as one word; lowercase.

which, that

See “that, which

wildlife

year-end

yearlong

ZIP code

Use all-caps ZIP for Zoning Improvement Plan, but always lowercase “code.”

Please include name and address, including ZIP code, on form when registering to attend.
 


Punctuation

ampersand (&)

Use this symbol if it is part of an official title; otherwise spell out the word “and.”

apostrophe

Apostrophes may be used for contractions (“don’t” for “do not”; “it’s” for “it is,” etc.) or to show possession (Larry’s letter). Plurals are formed by simply adding “s” not apostrophe “s.”

“It’s” only means “it is,” and does not attribute possession. The possessive of “it” is “its.”

To make a year plural, do not use an apostrophe between the year and the “s”:

1990s
in the ’60s
class reunion for years ending in 2s and 7s

bullets

When using bullets, generally lowercase the first word of each line and separate each bullet with a semicolon. One exception would be if a list of items or complete sentences were bulleted, in which case each point should begin with the first word capitalized and end with a period.

Iona graduates will be sought after because they will be:

  • ethical and skilled decision makers motivated to leadership and service;
  • professionals informed and enriched by a liberal arts education; and
  • workers who have achieved competence through both classroom instruction and actual experience;

To apply for admission as a freshman, please submit the following documents:

  1. Application for Admission, either Iona's or the Common Application.
  2. $50 application fee, with the check made out to Iona College.
  3. Official high school transcripts.
  4. SAT or ACT scores.
  5. An essay.

colon

Use a colon to set off text for emphasis: an example. Colons may also be used to introduce a list.

comma

As consistent with AP Style, no comma is required before a conjunction in a simple series:

The car is available in black, brown and blue.

dashes

Use a dash (or two hyphens if necessary) to set off an idea or example within a sentence. A consistent size and spacing should be used throughout a document when using dashes.

exclamation point

Use the mark to express a high degree of surprise, incredulity or other strong emotion. Avoid overuse.

period

Do not double space after a period between sentences.

quotation marks

Commas and periods go inside quotation marks, unless a slogan without such punctuation is being quoted. Question marks and exclamation points may go either outside or inside: outside, if these punctuation marks are not part of the quote; inside, if they are.

Do you believe Marcus’ claim, “I never saw those pastries”?

semicolon

Semicolons indicate a greater separation of thought and information than a comma, but less than a period. Use semicolons to replace commas in complicated listings that would otherwise become confusing to readers.

Ted Stark, Charlie Walsh and Jude Pago come from Nome, Alaska; Annandale, Va.; and Hollywood, Calif., respectively.

It is also Iona Style generally to use semi-colons in bulleted lists – a variation from AP Style. 

When colons are used to list more than two events, semi-colons should separate each line. The last semicolon should be followed with the word “and.” 

Semicolons can also be used as a “pause.”