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LIRIC

Fall 2017 Course Catalog

Fall Schedule at a Glance

Mondays Tuesdays Wednesdays Thursdays Fridays
October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30
November 6, 13, 27
October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31
November 7, 14, 28
LIRIC Special Events

November 1
Trip

December 8
Trip
October 5, 12, 19, 26
November 2, 9, 16, 30
October 6, 13, 20, 27
November 3, 10, 17
News and Views
10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
8 sessions
Tai Chi
9 – 10:00 a.m.
8 sessions
From the Big Bang to God
10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
4 sessions
Lecture Series: Australia
1 – 2:15 p.m.
7 sessions
Autumn Mélange
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
8 sessions
Fine & Performing Arts
10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
4 sessions
It’s Not Easy Being Green
10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
4 sessions
Film Course: Outtakes from the Outback: A Cinematic View of Australia
2:30 – 4:45 p.m.
7 sessions
Play Reading*
2 – 3:15 p.m.
8 sessions
From Loincloth to Lycra
10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
4 sessions
Cornucopia of History
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
7 sessions
iPAD for the Beginner, Part 2
2:30 – 4:00 p.m.
7 sessions
Art Workshop*
2 – 3:15 p.m.
8 sessions
Genocides of the 20th Century
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
4 sessions
Drawing and More
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
7 sessions
 
*Monday Only — Class may be extended at the discretion of the presenter. Path-Breaking Politics, Yesterday and Today
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
4 sessions
Literary Discussion
2 – 3:15 p.m.
7 sessions
 
Communicating with Almost Everyone!
2 – 3:15 p.m.
4 sessions
   
All That Jazz
2 – 3:15 p.m.
4 sessions
   
Short Story Workshop
2 – 3:15 p.m.
8 sessions
   

Classes begin Monday, October 2.

There will be classes Monday, October 9.

There will be no classes Thanksgiving Week, November 20 – 25.

Course Descriptions

Monday

News and Views

8 sessions: 10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30
November 6, 13, 27


Mel Radner, retired engineer and long-time LIRIC member, will alternate with Jim O’Neill, whose resumé includes experience in the political arena. They will lead provocative discussions of topical and often controversial news.

Autumn Mélange

8 sessions: 10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30
November 6, 13, 27


Join us for this series of eight totally unrelated – and thoroughly engrossing – talks.
October 2 Patriots in Petticoats, Presenter: Debra Palazzo
October 9 Why Is Water So Special? Presenter: Naomi Eliezer
October 16 Are You Your Own Person (Legally)? Presenter: Stan Amberg
October 23 Coming Soon to a Library Near You? Presenter: Jennifer O’Neill
October 30 Pompeii from A to V, Presenter: Phyllis Manner
November 6 Woman Suffragists of New Rochelle, Presenter: Barbara Davis
November 13 Myelin and Brain Function, Presenter: Jack Rosenbluth
November 27 Planetarium Trip (New Rochelle High School)

Class Representative: Joyce Kent

Play Reading*

8 sessions: 2 – 3:15 p.m.
October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30
November 6, 13, 27

* Class may be extended at the discretion of the presenter.

Old, new, comedy, drama, “the play’s the thing.” You’re welcome to join our group to read selected plays aloud or simply to listen if that’s what you prefer. The first play we’ll read is Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes. Scripts will be provided, as they will be for the additional plays which will be announced in the fall.

Presenters: Melba Shapiro, whose acting in high school plays created a lifelong interest in the theater – and in playwrights, play-reading and play-writing – will lead the class. She will be assisted by Lila Ogman, one of LIRIC’s founders, who remembers just how – and why – we came to have a play-reading class.

Class Representative: Benita Klugman

Art Workshop*

8 sessions: 2 – 3:15 p.m.
October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30
November 6, 13, 27

* Class may be extended at the discretion of the presenter.

In spite of the wide range of ability and experience among participants, each person is encouraged to develop his or her own style. All proceed at a comfortable pace while learning the fundamentals of composition, design, color and painting techniques. Even if you have never painted but have always wanted to try, you will find satisfaction and pleasure in this creative experience. Bring your own materials to the first class. If you have questions, call the instructor, Louise Stern at (914) 793-6652.

Instructor: Louise Stern has studied art in university settings as well as with known artists. She is listed in Who’s Who in American Art and is well represented in corporate art collections at Pfizer Pharmaceuticals and General Foods, among others. She studied at MOMA’s Peoples Institute with Don Stacy and is a member of Silvermine Guild of artists (New Canaan, Conn.), the National Association of Women Artists and others.

Class Representative: Anita Monte

Tuesday

Tai Chi

8 sessions: 9 – 10:00 a.m.
October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31
November 7, 14, 28 


Tai Chi, as it is practiced in the west today, can perhaps best be thought of as a moving form of yoga and meditation combined. In Chinese philosophy and medicine, “chi” is a vital force that animates the body; thus one purpose of Tai Chi is to enhance the health and vitality of the practitioner. Tai Chi also fosters a calm and tranquil mind by focusing on the precise execution of the exercises. Learning to do them correctly provides a practical method for improving balance, posture, alignment, fine-scale motor control, rhythm of movement and breathing. Tai Chi has been recommended as an adjunct therapy for chronic pain, arthritis, insomnia, asthma, high blood pressure, Parkinson’s, Multiple Sclerosis and fibromyalgia.

Instructor: Domingo Colon is the owner of the Tai Chi School of Westchester in Bronxville. He has been practicing Tai Chi since he was fifteen and is the teacher of other Tai Chi masters as well as a frequent judge at Tai Chi competitions.

Fine & Performing Arts

4 sessions: 10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
October 3, 10, 17, 24


Art, photography, music and dance! Join us as masters of these arts treat us to presentations in their respective fields.

October 3 Assyrian Art: A Story of Betrayal and Hope, Presenter: Kathy Skura
October 10 Barbershop Quartets: History and Performance, Presenters: The Westchester Chordsmen
October 17 Creative Photography, Presenter: Michael B. Friedman
October 24 Dance Yourself Healthy, Presenter: Hannah Park, Iona College F&PA Department

Moderator: Gail Apfel, chair of LIRIC’s Fine and Performing Arts committee, will introduce each session of this program, which she coordinated.

From Loincloth to Lycra

4 sessions: 10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
October 31
November 7, 14, 28


Louis XIV is reputed to have said: "Fashion is the mirror of history."

Did you know that Assyrian warriors went into battle wearing an ancient form of fishnet stockings? Did you know that Thomas à Becket wore a hair shirt filled with bugs? Why people wore what they did is another way of looking at the social, economic, political and moral climate of the times. In these four sessions we'll look at some of the outrageous, politically perilous, funky or lovely creations people have worn since Adam and Eve used fig leaves.

Presenter: Shirley Radcliffe taught in the New York City public school system for 38 years and at Manhattanville College after retirement from the public schools. Here at LIRIC she has led book discussions, given single lectures and offered classes on literature and language. Her class titled Women: Peasants, Workers, Revolutionaries was last spring’s most popular class.

Genocides of the 20th Century

4 sessions: 12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
October 3, 10, 17, 24


We are all familiar with the Holocaust, the first world-altering event to be labeled "genocide." However, the twentieth century is replete with other instances of man's efforts to totally eliminate particular segments of population. We will examine the Kaiser's genocide of indigenous peoples in Southwest Africa beginning in 1904, followed by the Turkish systematic extermination of the Armenian minority in 1915. The third class will focus on the Khmer Rouge elimination of 25 percent of the Cambodian population in the 1970s. The final topic will be the Hutu's barbaric slaughter of the Tutsis, which was unleashed in 1994 while the world watched.

Presenter: Rick Leibert, a retired adjunct professor of marketing at Iona College, is an educator at the Holocaust Museum and Study Center at Rockland Community College and a course leader at Collegium at Westchester Community College. Since becoming involved with LIRIC, he has led several book discussions and given us courses or talks on the Holocaust, sports, orphan trains in America and Russia.

Class Representative: Linda Levine

Path-Breaking Politics, Yesterday and Today

4 sessions: 12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
October 31
November 7, 14, 28


This series of four classes on path-breaking politics is offered by Iona’s Political Science Department under the auspices of Professor Robert Lacey, department chair.
October 31 Global Governance in the Age of Trump, Presenter: Dr. Joshua Leon
November 7 Party Polarization: Roots of the Modern 'Civil' Political War, Presenter: Dr. Mary Hagerty
November 14 Forgotten Founders, Presenter: Dr. Jeanne Zaino
November 28 The Conservatism of Winston Churchill, Presenter: Dr. Robert Lacey

Class Representative: Bob Kent

Communicating with Almost Everyone!

4 sessions: 2 – 3:15 p.m.
October 3, 10, 17, 24


Dr. Diane Ferrero-Paluzzi, who chairs Iona’s Department of Speech Communication Studies, returns to complete the course she began last spring with a series of four classes that are a sampler of what her department offers.

October 3 Talking in the Age of Digital Communication – Discover the changes in language and communication as a result of social media; learn the lingo while examining the pros and cons of the digital age.

October 10 Communicating Our Culture – Once we’ve learned how to express well who we ourselves are, and better understand cultural communication, we can begin to foster more effective (and possibly less offensive) communication.

Oct. 17/24 Storytelling – Learn storytelling and narrative techniques to develop stronger relationships with the younger generation. Discover how to organize your life story, and uncover the health benefits of storytelling.

Class Representative: Linda Whetzel

All That Jazz

4 sessions: 2 – 3:15 p.m.
October 31
November 7, 14, 28


The eighth semester of our new Jazz class will once again enjoy classic Jazz performances filmed in Europe in the mid-1960s: two intimate concerts by Sonny Rollins in one of his most creative periods; two concerts by Cannonball Adderley with one of the most celebrated sextets in Jazz history; three astounding concerts by Rahsaan Roland Kirk playing his entire instrument arsenal (often simultaneously!); and five performances over an 11-year span by Bill Evans, one of the most revered pianists in music history.

Presenter: Gregory Koster has been a Jazz fan since the early 60s, was a Jazz DJ in college, contributed Jazz reviews and surveys to The Sensible Sound magazine for over 15 years, and is a Board Member and Past President of the PJS Jazz Society in Mount Vernon.

Short Story Workshop

8 sessions: 2 – 3:15 p.m.
October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31
November 7, 14, 28


Interested in expanding your short narrative or converting a brief memoir into a short story? Starting from scratch with just the germ of an idea? This workshop is intended for those who wish to explore the short story form. We will examine short story masterpieces for elements such as setting, tone, characterization and conflict, then write, and share, our own stories.

Because this workshop builds sequentially on skills and techniques introduced at each session, no one will be admitted after the first class.

Instructor: Diana Spyropulos is a former LIRIC member and a published author, who brings to this workshop experience in teaching writing classes.

Wednesday

Special Events at LIRIC

Wednesdays are special at LIRIC. Classes are suspended that day to allow for additional intellectual and artistic pursuits off site. The familiar is intertwined with the new in often off-beat adventures. The goal is to expose our members to things and places that enrich and feed the mind as well as the soul. Space is limited, so LIRIC members receive first priority. Information about our trips – the November 1 and the December 8 one – will be sent at a later date.

Trip planner Florence Wagner currently co-directs, with her husband Bill, The Winged Foot Cross Country and Jumps Camps, serving track and field athletes across the United States. Florence has traveled extensively world-wide and looks forward to many years of sharing her wanderlust with LIRIC.

Thursday

From the Big Bang to God

4 sessions: 10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
October 5, 12, 19, 26


Our universe began with the Big Bang 13.72 BYA (billion years ago). It is not meaningful to ask what happened BEFORE that date because time did not exist "before" then. Stars and planets formed and some 4.5 BYA something called "life" developed on one planet we call Earth. Life evolved and grew in complexity and culminated in a self-aware species: humanity. As humans invented language and began to speculate about how people might have originated, the concept of "God" entered their thinking. In this four-session course we will explore the human saga of the interplay between man's science and man's religion.

Presenter: Dr. Raymond Peckauskas, emeritus professor of physics at Sarah Lawrence College, received his doctorate in biophysics from Cornell Medical School. We have had the good fortune to hear other stimulating lectures by this erudite scholar, including last spring’s course on God Among the Test Tubes.

Class Representative: Judy Clark

It’s Not Easy Being Green

4 sessions: 10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
November 2, 9, 16, 30


Think Kermit the Frog, and come learn about being green. Are you green? Is green a destination or a journey? We explore greening of the built environment, common design strategies, efficient ideas for your home and the economic benefits of being green. Energy use, conservation and alternatives are a focus.

Presenter: Brad Hochberg has recently held challenging positions as energy manager at Carnegie Mellon University (where he was affectionately known as “the energy guy”) and in the Pittsburgh Public Schools. His passion today is greening schools.

Cornucopia of History

7 sessions: 12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
October 5, 12, 19, 26
November 2, 9, 16


Four eminent historians address events of the past in their respective fields of interest and expertise.

October 5 and 12 The Rise of Japan: 1850-1947, Presenter: Martin McCormack
October 19 and 26 Nineteenth Century Literary and Anthropological Hoaxes about Native Americans, Presenter: David Oestreicher
November 2 and 9 The Mind of the American Revolutionary Era, Presenter: Walt Johanson
November 16 The Protestant Reformation Revisited, Presenter: Reverend Paul Sauer, Concordia College

Class Representative: Linda Creary

Drawing and More

7 sessions: 12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
October 5, 12, 19, 26
November 2, 9, 16


Like to draw? Dream of taking your stick figures to the next level? Here’s where to start. We’ll cover the basics of design, contour, shading and composition – with in-depth demos to help you draw various types of objects – and have fun while bringing out the artist in you. Newcomers are welcome, as are returning students. No experience or talent necessary – just the desire to learn. Please bring an 11x14 sketch pad, a 2B pencil and a kneaded or white vinyl (Magic Rub) eraser to the first class, where you’ll receive a complete supply list. (You may add color if you wish.) Questions? Call Gail at (914) 961-5661.

Instructor Gail Apfel graduated from New York City’s High School of Music and Art with a major in Textile Design, then studied art at Buffalo State College and the Westchester Art Workshop. She taught photography and Arts and Crafts at summer camps for years and worked as a designer of custom framing as a sideline while teaching Special Education at the high school level in Westchester. Gail chairs our Fine Arts Committee.

Literary Discussion

7 sessions: 2 – 3:15 p.m.
October 5, 12, 19, 26
November 2, 9, 16


In keeping with our Friday lecture theme of Australia, the works selected for this term are either set in Australia or are by Australian writers. As always, the short works will be distributed in class the week before they are to be discussed.
October 5 The Secret River, by Kate Neville, Presenter: Beth Hofstetter
October 12 excerpts from Blue Latitudes, by Tony Horwitz, Presenter: Linda Whetzel
October 19 The Road From Coorain, by Jill Ker Conway, Presenter: Kathleen Fredrick
October 26 selected short stories by Tim Winton, Presenter: Teddi Cerino
November 2 The Dressmaker, by Rosalie Ham, Presenter: Shirley Radcliffe
November 9 Australian short stories, Presenter: Rick Leibert
November 16 A River Town, by Thomas Keneally, Presenter: Mary Arnone

Class Representative: Shirley Radcliffe

Friday

Lecture Series: Australia

7 sessions: 1 – 2:15 p.m.
October 6, 13, 20, 27
November 3, 10, 17
Class meets in the Christopher J. Murphy Auditorium


Discover more about Australia than kangaroos and boomerangs, from its place in history to its contributions to 21st century philosophy.

October 6 Race Relations in Australia, Presenter: Professor James Carroll, Iona College History Department
October 13 Gallipoli, Presenter: Jim O’Neill
October 20 Antipodean Thought: The Low-Down on Philosophy from the Land Down Under, Presenter: Professor Alex Eodice, Iona College Philosophy Department
October 27 Life in Australia, Presenter: Jay Dubner
November 3 The Australian New Wave in Film, Presenter: Professor Dean DeFino, Iona College English Department
November 10 “La Stupenda” – Joan Sutherland, the Dame for Down Under, Presenter: Professor Treva Foss, Soprano
November 17 Indigenous Animals of Australia, Presenter: Joyce Kent

Class Representatives: Paula Porricelli

Film Course: Outtakes from the Outback: A Cinematic View of Australia

7 sessions: 2:30 – 4:45 p.m.
October 6, 13, 20, 27
November 3, 10, 17
The first class will be held in Murphy Auditorium. Subsequent venues will be announced.


It’s 1906 and the first feature film ever made hits the silver screen. A Hollywood production? No. The Story of the Kelly Gang was written, filmed and produced in Australia. By 1914 Australians went to the movies more often than any other nation in the world, but Australia’s foray into the movie business was limited and short-lived. Not until the 1970s, with the support of government funding, did Aussie filmmakers and performers return to prominence on the silver screen. As of 2016, a total of 43 Academy Awards from 154 nominations have been won by Australians.

Australian films are different: artsy, quirky, and at times, boldly outrageous. Wealthy gentry, rough bush workers, blokes, larrikins, tough independent women and diverse nationalities populate their screens as do their indigenous people, the aborigines, to whom Australian filmmakers have given a public voice and visibility. We’ll be viewing the following films:
  • October 6 The Piano
  • October 13 Rabbit Proof Fence
  • October 20 Picnic at Hanging Rock
  • October 27 Gallipoli
  • November 3 The Dressmaker
  • November 10 Strictly Ballroom
  • November 17 Miss Fisher Murder Mysteries
Instructor: Cheryl Passavanti is a learning facilitator and lecturer on current topics about and through film. A frequenter of film festivals and film clubs, she has brought her expertise to the New Rochelle Staff Resource Center, the Adult Education program in New Rochelle, and in the last few years, to LIRIC.

Class Representative: Lorraine Rosano

iPAD for the Beginner, Part 2

7 sessions: 2:30 – 4:00 p.m.
October 6, 13, 20, 27
November 3, 10, 17
Class meets at Iona College, Murphy Center, Room 127


We will continue to build on the iPad skills learned in our Spring 2017 session. Students registering for this course should have basic knowledge of their iPad, such as: location of buttons and ports (on/off, volume, charging port), display and sound settings, wi-fi settings and location services. iPad for the Beginner Part 2 will include:
  • Downloading and using Apps such as:
    • Flixster
    • Kindle
    • Weather Underground
  • Borrowing eBooks from the Westchester Library System
  • Backing up files and photos to a Mac or PC (if time permits)
Student Requirements:
  1. Students must register through LIRIC, using the Technology Registration Form on page 23 of the Course Catalog, or you will NOT be admitted to class. If you have questions about registration, please contact LIRIC’s Director, Suzanne Page at spage@iona.edu.
  2. Students must bring their iPad to class (iPad, iPad Air, iPad Mini or iPhone)
  3. Students must have an Apple ID and password, and bring it to our first class — Knowing your Apple ID is CRITICAL. If you do not know it, contact Apple, or go to an Apple store and have their support staff assist you.
  4. Students must have a working email address and password and bring it to class.
  5. Students must have intermediate experience using their iPad and must have basic computing skills such as searching the internet and using email.
Instructors: Diana Breen, former manager of the Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching at Iona College (CELTIC), has a B.S. in computer science and a M.A. in English. She has developed software for IBM and has been an independent hardware/software consultant, a high school teacher and a technology coordinator.

Anna Martone has been an independent computer consultant for over twenty years. Anna has developed training materials and documentation that have been used in various training programs. Her varied clients include government entities, local colleges, and some of the top financial institutions.

Membership and Fees

LIRIC is a completely self-supporting membership institute within Iona’s School of Arts and Science.

Membership is $190 for a full year (September through August) or $110 for the second half (March through August). We do not offer fall-only memberships.

The membership fee entitles you to participate in all courses (though an additional fee is required for tai chi), grants full privileges at the Iona College Library and entitles you to audit courses at Iona and to use the Iona athletic facilities at a reduced rate. Though trips and special events require additional fees and registration, except for tai chi and computer courses it is not necessary to register for individual classes.

Since we mail name tags and parking pass applications within a few days of the due date indicated on the LIRIC application, please send in your application and payment early. If we do not receive your paperwork on time, we cannot guarantee that you will receive our mailing before the first day of classes.

Refund policy: 100 percent before classes start, 75 percent after the first week, no refunds thereafter. Refund requests must be submitted in writing to the Membership Chair. If a member has not attended classes because of illness, the dues will be credited for the following year only (medical proof required).

How to Contact Us

Our director can be contacted by voice mail at (914) 633-2675, or by e-mail at spage@iona.edu.

The following individuals may also be contacted:
Chris McCormick, President, (914) 237-6922
Linda Whetzel, Curriculum Chair, (718) 324-1120
Teddi Cerino, Member Liaison, liric005@gmail.com
Lorraine Rosano, Membership, (914) 576-0017
Barbara Mohalley, Member News, (914) 576-2311
Frank Mohalley, Treasurer, (914) 576-2318
Florence Wagner, Trip Coordinator, (718) 884-2268

Name Tags

You will receive a name tag in your Welcome Packet. Please be sure to wear it each time you attend a LIRIC class. It identifies you as a paid member and will help others learn your name.

Classes: When and Where

LIRIC offers two eight-week semesters (fall and spring) and two four-week intersessions (January and July). During the eight-week semesters, classes meet for three full days on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, and on Friday afternoons and Saturday mornings. Intersession classes meet one full day each week.

Monday, Tuesday and Thursday courses are held at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, 10 Mill Road, New Rochelle. Friday and Saturday classes meet on the Iona Campus. Some classes run simultaneously.

Parking Passes for the Iona Campus

Iona generously allows LIRIC members to use their campus parking facilities during our Friday and Saturday classes and when we take trips. A parking application and instructions for where to send it are included in your Welcome Packet. Note, however, that your Iona Parking Permit, which must be displayed on your dashboard, only allows you to use student parking spaces, which are marked by white lines. You may not park in any spaces marked restricted or reserved or surrounded by yellow lines, nor may you park in Visitor spaces. If you violate these parking rules, you risk a boot and/or ticket and you jeopardize parking privileges for all LIRIC members.

Perks and Privileges

Because LIRIC is considered part of Iona, members are entitled to the use of Iona’s Ryan Library, a reduced membership at Hynes Athletics Center, free auditing of one college course each semester and attendance at a variety of on-campus cultural events at student prices. Complete information is in the Perks and Privileges handout available from the Director.

Stormy Weather

In the event of bad weather, LIRIC closings will be announced in the following places:
Listen to: WCBS 880 AM; WVOX 1460 AM; WHUD 100.7 FM
Watch: The bottom bar on Optimum Channel 12 or Verizon FIOS 1 or log on to News12.com or Fios1news.com.