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LIRIC Spring Session 2020

LIRIC classes are cancelled until further notice.

Spring Schedule at a Glance

Mondays
March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; April 13, 27

Bioethical Issues
March 2, 9, 16
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.

Science & Theology
March 23, 30; April 13, 27
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.

Two Of A Kind?
Every Monday
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.

Play-Reading
Every Monday
2 – 3:15 p.m.

Art Workshop
March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; April 13
2 - 3:15 p.m.

Doodle Away!
April 27
2 - 3:15 p.m.
Tuesdays
March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31; April 14, 21, 28

Tai Chi
Every Tuesday
9 - 10 a.m.

Writer’s Workshop
Class Begins March 10
March 10, 17, 24, 31; April 14, 21, 28
9 - 10:15 a.m.

Philosophy Of Law
March 31; April 14, 21, 28
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.

The American Judicial System
October 8, 15
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.

Calligraphy 2
Every Tuesday
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.

Peoples Of The First Nations
March 3, 10, 17, 24
12:30–1:45 p.m.

Thinking About Learning
March 31; April 14, 21, 28
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.

The Roaring Twenties
March 3, 10, 17, 24
2 - 3:15 p.m.

The Shapes Of Music
March 31
2 - 3:15 p.m.

Classical Music 101
April 14, 21, 28
2 - 3:15 p.m.
Wednesdays
LIRIC Special Events

April 1-Trip
Trip - Thomas Paine Cottage

April 22-Trip
Trip - Goodspeed Opera House
South Pacific

May 13 - Spring Luncheon
Thursdays
March 5, 12, 19, 26; April 2, 16, 23, 30

Great Decisions
Every Thursday
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.

Mah Jongg, Part 2
Every Thursday
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.

A Giant Awakes - Understanding China
March 5, 12, 19, 26; April 2, 16
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.

Unraveling DNA
April 23
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.

Drawing and More
Every Thursday
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.

Literary Discussion
Every Thursday
2 - 3:15 p.m.  
Fridays
March 6, 13, 27; April 3, 17, 24; May 1

Lecture Series: The Other
Every Friday
1 - 2:15 p.m.

Film Course: Bigotry On Film

2:30–4:45 p.m. No Class April 24. Classes Will Be Held In Romita Auditorium In Ryan Library.
2:30 - 4:45 p.m.

Everyday Excel, Part 2
No Class April 24 or May 1
Note: Class begins October 18 2:30 - 4 p.m.

Course Descriptions

Mondays

Bioethical Issues In Contemporary Society

3 sessions March 2, 9, 13
10:30 a. m. – 11:45 a.m.

Because of technological advances, we are often faced with making decisions that involve examining our ethical perspectives and confronting choices that may be in conflict with our values. This three- part series will examine current issues as well as several historical ethical dilemmas.

Presenter: Joyce Kent is the retired chairperson of Science at New Rochelle High School where she introduced a course on Bioethics. Her class at LIRIC on bioethical issues has become a spring tradition. Joyce chairs the Science and Technology arm of the Curriculum Committee in addition to arranging field trips to the planetarium and occasional nature walks.


Science And Theology In The 21st Century

4 sessions March 23, 30; April 13, 27
10:30 a.m. – 11:45 p.m.

The emphasis in this four-part course will be on how science and theology intertwine in the twenty-first century. We will begin by examining scientists’ comments on religion, especially those of Nobel laureate Richard Feynman and maverick Jesuit anthropologist Teilhard de Chardin. Then we’ll take a look at a post-Christian phenomenon called the “weak theology movement,” one that attempts to characterize the divine as a weak force in the universe, a polar opposite of the traditional “strong theology” attacked by New Atheists like Dawkins and Harris.

Presenter: Dr. Raymond Peckauskas, emeritus professor of physics at Sarah Lawrence College, received his doctorate in biophysics from Cornell Medical School. We have had the good fortune to hear other stimulating lectures by this erudite scholar, including last fall’s course on Exploring an Invisible World.


Two Of A Kind?

March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; April 13, 27
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.

What is more fun and interesting than learning about people who have changed the world and affected our own lives? Presentations will cover a scientific dispute over dinosaur bones, two glamorous fashion entrepreneurs, inventors that made, and are making, our lives easier, rocket men whose ideas put a man on the moon and divas that enhanced our lives with beautiful music.

  • March 2
    • Style: Coco Chanel and Gloria Vanderbilt
      Presenter: Lois Lovisolo
  • March 9
    • Invention: Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse (with a bit of Nicola Tesla)
      Presenter: Lois Lovisolo
  • March 16
    • Rockets: Robert Goddard and Werner von Braun
      Presenter: Lois Lovisolo
  • March 23
    • Dinosuar Bones: Edward Drinker Cope and Othniel Marsh
      Presenter: Jo-Anne Weinberg
  • March 30
    • Opera: Beverly Sills and Leontyne Price
      Presenter: Kobie Thaker
  • April 13
    • Entrepreneurs: Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk
      Presenter: Kobie Thaker
  • April 27
    • Explorers: Gertrude Bell and Lawrence of Arabia
      Presenter: Lois Lovisolo

The presenters are all LIRIC members who have done extensive research on their subjects which they are willing to share to add to our already impressive store of knowledge.


Play-Reading


March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; April 13, 27
2 – 3:15 p.m.

Old, new, comedy, drama, “the play’s the thing.” You’re welcome to join our group to read selected plays aloud, or simply to listen if that’s what you prefer. The first play we’ll read is Lost in the Stars by Maxwell Anderson and Kurt Weill. Scripts will be provided, as they will be for the additional plays which will be announced in the spring.

Presenter: Lila Ogman, one of the founding members of LIRIC, has been a member of the play-reading class since its inception.


Art Workshop

March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; April 13
2 – 3:15 p.m.

In spite of the wide range of ability and experience among participants, each person is encouraged to develop his or her own style. All proceed at a comfortable pace while learning the fundamentals of composition, design, color, and painting techniques. Even if you have never painted but have always wanted to try, you will find satisfaction and pleasure in this creative experience. Bring your own materials to the first class.

Instructor: Rosemary Cummins is an artist and art teacher who holds a degree in Fine Arts and has herself studied with a variety of well-known artists and art educators.


Doodle Away!

April 27
2 – 3:15 p.m.

Create your very own abstract design in pen and ink, and doodle away! Materials will be provided.

There is room for only 25 in this workshop, so be sure to sign up on the clipboard at the back desk during the week of March 30.

Instructor: Rosemary Cummins is an artist and art teacher who holds a degree in Fine Arts and has herself studied with a variety of well-known artists and art educators.

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Tuesdays

TAI CHI

Pre-registration and an additional non-refundable fee of $65.00 are required for this class.
March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31; April 14, 21, 28
9 – 10 a.m.

Tai Chi, as it is practiced in the west today, can perhaps best be thought of as a moving form of yoga and meditation combined. In Chinese philosophy and medicine, “chi” is a vital force that animates the body; thus one purpose of Tai Chi is to enhance the health and vitality of the practitioner. Tai Chi also fosters a calm and tranquil mind by focusing on the precise execution of the exercises. Learning to do them correctly provides a practical method for improving balance, posture, alignment, fine-scale motor control, rhythm of movement, and breathing. Tai Chi has been recommended as an adjunct therapy for chronic pain, arthritis, insomnia, asthma, high blood pressure, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis and fibromyalgia.

Instructor: Domingo Colon is the owner of the Tai Chi School of Westchester in Bronxville and has been practicing Tai Chi since he was fifteen. He teaches other Tai Chi masters and frequently serves as a Tai Chi judge.


WRITER’S WORKSHOP

March 10, 17, 24, 31; April 14, 21, 28
9 – 10:15 a.m.

All of us have a vast number of stories and experiences within us just waiting to be heard. Here is your chance to release your hidden Hemingway and Tolstoy as the class explores a variety of writing experiences in a relaxed informal setting.

Facilitators: Chuck Miller enjoys writing and sharing that joy with others. An educator for 48 years, as well as past editor of LIRIC’s newsletter, Chuck encourages each participant’s writing aspirations. Claire Lynch, a member of LIRIC’s writing class for almost 20 years, will lead the April 21 and 28 classes.


Philosophy Of Law

March 3, 10, 17, 24
10:30 – 11:45 a.m.

This class is an introduction to some of the central themes in the philosophy of law. We will concentrate on four main issues, one each week: The nature and validity of law: natural law theory v. legal positivism; Legal interpretation and the Constitution; Rights, liberty, and the limits of law; and The right of privacy.

These themes are unified by a consideration of the relationship between law and morality. How does law differ from morality? Should legal reasoning and judicial interpretation be based on moral beliefs? What are legal rights and moral rights; should morality ever be enforced by law? What is the relationship between law and the political morality of liberalism? How do we balance individual liberty and collective interest? What is legal responsibility?

What does the Constitution guarantee? What is the extent of law’s coercive power? Though such questions issue in highly theoretical and conceptual investigations, they also underscore the profound practical significance of legal theory. An important aim of this course, then, is to understand the complex relationship between the philosophy of law and the actual practice not only of legal professionals but also of ordinary citizens in a civil society.

Presenter: Alex Eodice, a professor of Philosophy and Chair of the Philosophy Department at Iona College, has also served as Director of the Honors Program and Dean of the School of Arts and Science. He holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Fordham University and a professional certificate in Management and Leadership in Education from Harvard.


The American Judicial System

March 31; April 14, 21, 28
10:30 – 11:45 a.m.

As we examine the American judicial system we will look at its origin and structure. What role does the U.S. Constitution play? (Did its Framers forget something?) What are the differences between trial and appellate courts? How are judges selected? We’ll consider the importance of precedent. (Will today’s law, such as a woman’s right to choose, be gone tomorrow?) What are the respective roles of judges, lawyers and juries? (Would you rather have a judge or a jury “decide” your case?) What happens in trials? What are the different standards of proof?We will cover the evolving societal goals in criminal justice, Constitutional considerations in criminal justice, classifications of criminal conduct, culpable mental states (criminal intent), and plea bargaining. We will interweave, in all the discussions, a history of our judge-made law system (the “common law”) and explain how that judicial system co-exists with (and imposes limits on and is limited by) the laws made by Congress and State legislatures.

Presenter: Stan Amberg is a graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, MIT and Harvard Law School.


Calligraphy 2

March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31; April 14, 21, 28
10:30 – 11:45 a.m.

A continuation of the one begun in the fall, this workshop provides hands-on instruction of the Italic style of calligraphy. It is open only to those who have taken the LIRIC calligraphy class or already know calligraphy and wish to practice further. Bring your calligraphy pen to the first class! Questions? Contact Eileen Allen (914) 608-2555 or eileenbecca@gmail.com.

Instructor: Eileen Allen has a BA in Fine Art and an MA in Art Education. She worked creatively in the business world in addition to teaching high school art and abstract art at LIRIC.


Peoples Of The First Nations

March 3, 10, 17, 24
12:30–1:45 p.m.

From the arrival of Europeans, the indigenous peoples of this continent have faced impossible odds. Non-Native-Americans have predicted that the “Indian” would disappear, but the story of the Native Peoples of North America is a story of survival. This course will trace the complex interactions between Native communities and European colonists from the 15th century – with its land appropriation and cultural annihilation – through the 20th century – with its struggles over tribal sovereignty and religious freedom. The course will attempt to show the resilience and creativity of the peoples of the First Nations.

Presenter: Shirley Radcliffe taught in the New York City public school system for 38 years, and after retirement at Manhattanville College. Here at LIRIC she has led book discussions, given single lectures, and offered classes on literature, language, dining, clothes, the year 1491, the infrastructure, and art. One of LIRIC’s two vice-presidents, she also chairs the Humanities Committee.


Thinking About Learning

March 31; April 14, 21, 28
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.

What are we talking about when we say we learned something? How does that happen, and what makes it happen more or less effectively? Does it depend on positive reinforcement, as behaviorists think? On holistic insight, as the Gestalt theorists claim? On social context, as some situationists argue?What’s the difference between learning to ride a bike and learning to solve a calculus problem? Between remembering someone’s name and critiquing a poem? Do all people learn the same way, or do they vary by style, by age, by culture? What factors make us learn better or worse in different kinds of contexts – classrooms, workplaces, playgrounds? Do we learn better or worse when we are distracted, interrupted, or pressured? In this course, we will explore some approaches to answering these questions proposed by philosophers and scholars from Plato to Locke, from William James to Jerome Bruner. And we will think about learning as a lifelong experience, even beyond LIRIC.

Presenter: David Moore earned a doctorate in Learning Environments from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 1977. After brief stints at Columbia Teachers College and Washington University in St. Louis, he spent 33 years on the faculty of the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at NYU. He did extensive research and publishing on experiential learning (internships, service-learning, community engagement), and taught a variety of courses on concepts like community, the meaning of work, and everyday life.


The Roaring Twenties In America: The Jazz Age

March 3, 10, 17, 24
2 – 3:15 p.m.

The 1920s was a decade of dramatic social, economic, and political change. It was an age of intense cultural conflict, impacted by the tremendous growth in cities, the rise of consumer culture, the upsurge of mass entertainment, and the revolution in morals and manners. Many Americans found the country’s turn away from the restrictions of the Victorian past liberating, while others viewed it as threatening. The result was a cultural civil war with bitter clashes over such issues as immigration, evolution, prohibition, race, and women’s roles.

At the same time, this decade of prosperity and dissipation produced a flowering of the arts in America, giving us F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway and the Gershwins, to name just a few. We will take a look and listen to these and other significant representations of The Jazz Age before considering how the socio-cultural milieu of the Twenties can help us better understand some of our own conflicts today.

Presenter: Geoffrey Cahn has a Ph.D. in History and is Chair Emeritus of the History Department at Yeshiva University High School in New York City. He has been teaching at both the university and high school level for over forty years, and last semester offered us a course on Weimar Germany.


The Shapes Of Music

March 31
2 – 3:15 p.m.

Joan Mallory, former head of Nyack College’s Music Education Department who has given us hours of enjoyment with her opera courses, returns to LIRIC to give us an interactive class on such musical forms as fugues, sonatas, concertos and lieders.


Classical Music 101

April 14, 21, 28
2 – 3:15 p.m.

Our final series in classical music goes back to the beginning: Music in the Ancient World – and then traces the evolution of music through the Christian World, to the First Composers, the High Renaissance, the Baroque, and ends with the crowning glory of Handel and J.S. Bach. The material is again based on So I’ve Heard, a comprehensive history of classical music (with copious musical selections) by the late Alan Rich, former classical music critic of The New York Times.

Presenter: Gregory Koster has been a classical music fan since the early ‘60s, and has attended as many classical concerts, ballets, and operas as his beloved jazz performances.


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Thursdays

Great Decisions

March 5, 12, 19, 26; April 2, 16, 23, 30
10:30 – 11:45 a.m.

Great Decisions is a course sponsored by the Foreign Policy Association that encourages people to learn about and discuss U.S. foreign policy. Each session includes a 30-minute DVD for background and then a discussion led by LIRIC members. Although it is not required, participants who wish to get the most from the course should purchase a copy of the Great Decisions Briefing Book ($32.00 + shipping) and do the readings for each class. Copies may be ordered directly from The Foreign Policy Association by calling 1-800-477-5836 between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or by ordering online at www.greatdecisions.org.

  • March 5
    • Climate Change and Global Order
      Presenter: Brad Hochberg
  • March 12
    • India and Pakistan
      Presenter: Muhammad Saleem
  • March 19
    • Red Sea Security
      Presenter: Alan Sloate
  • March 26
    • Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking
      Presenter: Paul Lennon
  • April 2
    • U.S. Relations with the Northern Triangle
      Presenter: Regina O’Donnell
  • April 16
    • China’s Road into Latin America
      Presenter: Jim O’Neill
  • April 23
    • The Philippines and the U.S.
      Presenter: Roseanne Klein
  • April 30
    • Artificial Intelligence
      Presenter: Lewis Koflowitz

Mah Jongg, Part 2

March 5, 12, 19, 26; April 2, 16, 23, 30
10:30 – 11:45 a.m.

While mah jongg involves a degree of chance, it is primarily a game of skill, strategy, and calculation. This class in intended only for those who took Mah Jongg during the fall semester, or for those who already know the game, since it will be a practicum for people who wish to enhance their skills. If you have your own mah jongg card, please bring it to the first class.
Please call instructor Linda Levine at (914) 235-9878 by March 1 to register.


A Giant Awakes - Understanding China In The Modern World

March 5, 12, 19, 26; April 2, 16
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.

As China takes its place in the modern world, it faces immense difficulties: a growing inequality gap, widespread corruption, and rampant pollution, all of which provoke mounting calls for political reform. This course will examine the future of U.S.– China relations in light of ongoing conflicts in trade, military, and other issues. We will examine China’s past, from ancient times onward, and explore its history, philosophies, and traditions to try to better understand the underlying forces that explain China today.

Presenter: Formerly a partner at American China Mercantile and Senior Manager at IBM and Amdocs, Jim Levey holds a Masters in China Studies from St. John’s University and has traveled to China extensively on business. He is now lecturing at continuing education centers in the New York metro area and working to introduce China Studies into the pub-lic schools curriculum.


Unraveling The Secrets Of DNA

April 23
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.

Join Dr. Robert B. Reggio, who holds a Ph.D. in Biology and has taught at the college level, as he teaches us about DNA.


Drawing And More

March 5, 12, 19, 26; April 2, 16, 23
12:30 – 1:45 p.m.

Like to draw? Dream of taking your stick figures to the next level? Here’s where to start. We’ll cover the basics of design, contour, shading and composition – with in-depth demos to help you draw various types of objects – and have fun while bringing out the artist in you. Newcomers are welcome, as are returning students. No experience or talent necessary – just the desire to learn. Please bring an 11x14 sketch pad, a 2B pencil and a kneaded or white vinyl (Magic Rub) eraser to the first class, where you’ll receive a complete supply list. (You may add color if you wish.) Questions? Call Gail at (914) 961-5661.

Instructor: Gail Apfel, a NYC High School of Music and Art graduate with a concentration in Textile Design, studied art at Buffalo State College and the Westchester Art Workshop. She has taught photography and arts and crafts and has worked as a custom framing designer. Gail chairs LIRIC’s Fine and Performing Arts Committee.


Literary Discussion

March 5, 12, 19, 26; April 2, 16, 23
2 – 3:15 p.m.

In keeping with the theme of our Friday afternoon lecture series, all of our selections deal with the experiences of people who might be considered “other” because of their race, religion, ethnicity or gender. Short works will be distributed in class the week before they are to be discussed.

Note: We have a special guest on April 2nd when Professor Aaron Rosenfeld, of Iona’s English Department, presents works by minority poets.

  • March 5
    • The Great Believers, by Rebecca Makkai
      Presenter: Kobie Thakar
  • March 12
    • Selected short stories
      Presenter: Rick Leibert
  • March 19
    • Selected short works
      Presenter: Teddi Cerino
  • March 26
    • Real America: A Memoir, by Julie Lythcott-Hains
      Presenter: Linda Whetzel
  • April 2
    • Minority Poetry
      Presenter: Professor Aaron Rosenfeld, Iona College English Department
  • April 16
    • There, There, by Tommy Orange
      Presenter: Jeanne de Saint Ouen
  • April 23
    • Selected short stories
      Presenter: Beth Hofstetter

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Fridays

Lecture Series: The Other

This semester we take a look at “the other” in our society, the “not-like-me” people who differ from us by virtue of their race, religion, ethnicity or gender.

The theme is borne out not only in this lecture series, which begins with a sociologist’s talk on the nature of prejudice and discrimination, but in three other LIRIC courses as well:

  • The film course which follows each Friday lecture
  • Thursday afternoon’s 2 p.m. Literary Discussion class, and
  • A four-part course on Tuesdays at 12:30 on Peoples of the First Nations

Consider enriching and enhancing your experience by attending one or more of them.

  • March 6
    Romita Auditorium in Ryan Library
    • The Complex Nature of Prejudice and Discrimination
      Presenter: Dr. William S. Egelman, Professor Emeritus, Iona College Department of Criminal Justice & Sociology
  • March 13
    Christopher J. Murphy Auditorium
    • In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens: Writings by Black Transgender Women
      Presenter: Dr. Timothy S.Lyle, Iona College English Department
  • March 27
    Christopher J. Murphy Auditorium
    • Islamophobia
      Presenter: Dr. Rachana Umashankar, Iona College Religious Studies Dept.
  • April 3
    Christopher J. Murphy Auditorium
    • Race in Advertising
      Presenter: Dr. Tony Kelso, Chair, Iona College Media & Strategic Communication Department
  • April 17
    Romita Auditorium in Ryan Library
    • Prejudice in the Criminal Justice System
      Presenter: Dr. Paul O’Connell, Iona College Department of Criminal Justice & Sociology
  • April 24
    Christopher J. Murphy Auditorium
    • A Holy Nation: Christian Nationalism and its Dangers
      Presenter: Dr. Jennifer Kaalund, Iona College Religious Studies Dept.
  • May 1
    Romita Auditorium in Ryan Library
    • Race in New Rochelle
      Presenter: Barbara Davis, City of New Rochelle Historian

Class Representative: Linda Creary


Film Course: Bigotry On Film

March 6, 13, 27; April 3, 17; May 1
2:30 – 4:45 p.m.

NOTE: All classes meet in Romita Auditorium in Ryan Library.

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background or his religion. People learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.” – Nelson Mandela

Films educate, raise awareness, and inspire change like few other forms of media. Film can be a weapon in the multicultural wars dividing the contemporary ethnic landscape of American society. In a world where visual media dominates and social media is the channel through which we communicate, there is no better tool for changing hearts and minds than film. Hopefully, the following selections will illuminate a greater understanding of our differences and inspire positive social change.

  • March 6
    • "The Two of Us", 1967, directed by Claude Berri
  • March 13
    • "Ma Vie en Rose", 1997, directed by Alain Berliner
  • March 27
    • "Arranged", 2007, directed by Diane Crespo & Stefan Schaefer
  • April 3
    • "Fruitvale Station", 2013, directed by Ryan Coogler
  • April 17
    • "Dolores", 2018, directed by Peter Bratt
  • May 1
    • "Accidental Courtesy: Daryl Davis, Race & America", 2016, directed by Matthew Ornstein

Instructor: Cheryl Passavanti is a learning facilitator and lecturer on current topics about and through film. A frequenter of film festivals and film clubs, she has brought her expertise to the New Rochelle Staff Resource Center, the Adult Education program in New Rochelle, and, in the last few years, to LIRIC.

Class Representative: Lorraine Rosano


EVERYDAY EXCEL, Part 2

You must register for this course by February 13 using the Computer Registration Form on the last page of this catalog. No students will be admitted to class unless they are confirmed through LIRIC.

March 6, 13, 27; April 3, 17
2:30 – 4 p.m.

Class Meets at Iona College Murphy Computer Lab Room 122

Excel is a spreadsheet program that can be used for personal budgeting, monthly expenses, or processing and organizing information.

Topics for Everyday Excel, Part 2 will include:

  • Reviewing Excel Part 1 – the Excel Interface including Menus, Ribbons, Cell Formats, Creating, Saving and Retrieving documents
  • Continue with our “Keeping Track of Personal Expenses” project
  • Organizing your work with AutoCorrect, Naming Ranges, Add comments, and Using Text Boxes
  • Copying and Pasting data from other applications, e.g. MS Word
  • Formatting Borders and Shading
  • Various Printing Features such as Page Breaks, Headers and Footers, Print Are, and Print Titles
  • As time permits, we will continue with Formulas and Functions and Sorting and Filtering data

Student Requirements:

  1. Working knowledge of windows for PCs
  2. Working email account
  3. Must bring a USB flash drive to every class to save work.

 

Instructors: Diana Breen, former manager of the Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching at Iona College (CELTIC), has a B.S. in computer science and a M.A. in English. She has developed software for IBM and has been an independent hardware/software consultant, a high school teacher and a technology coordinator.

Anna Martone has been an independent computer consultant for over twenty years. Anna has developed training materials and documentation that have been used in various training programs. Her varied clients include government entities, local colleges, and some of the top financial institutions.


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