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Spring Session 2019

Spring Schedule at a Glance

Mondays
March 4, 11, 18, 25; April 1, 8, 22.

It’s Still Not Easy Being Green
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
3 sessions

From Lifeless Earth To Human Mind
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
4 sessions

The History Of Medicine
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
4 sessions

Topics In Psychology
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
3 sessions

Playreading
Class may be extended at the discretion of the presenter.

2 - 3:15 p.m.
7 sessions

Art Workshop
Class may be extended at the discretion of the presenter.

2 - 3:15 p.m.
7 sessions
Tuesdays
March 5, 12, 19, 26; April 2, 9, 23, 30.

Tai Chi
9 - 10 a.m.
8 sessions

Writer’s Workshop
Class begins March 12

9 - 10:15 a.m.
7 sessions

Bioethical Issues
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
4 sessions

The King Between Two Queens
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
4 sessions

Built
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
4 sessions

Thinking About Culture
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
4 sessions

Tuesdays @ Two
2 - 3:15 p.m.
5 sessions

Classical Music 101
2 - 3:15 p.m.
3 sessions
Wednesdays
Liric Special Events

March 27-Trip
Bus Tour of New Rochelle

April 17-Trip
The Cloisters

May 15
Spring Luncheon

May 22-Play
Botanic Garden
Thursdays
March 7, 14, 21, 28; April 4, 11, 25; May 2

Art In The Abstract
9 - 10:15 a.m.
8 sessions

Great Decisions
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
8 sessions

Spring Salmagundi
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
6 sessions

Drawing and More
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
6 sessions

Literary Discussion
2 - 3:15 p.m.
6 sessions
Fridays
March 1, 8, 15, 29; April 5, 12, 26; May 3

Lecture Series: Coming to America!
1 - 2:15 p.m.
8 sessions

Film Course: Stranger in a Strange Land
Classes will be held in Romita Auditorium in Ryan Library.

2:30 - 4:45 p.m.
8 sessions

Everyday Excel
Class begins March 15
2:30 - 4 p.m.
6 sessions

Course Descriptions

Mondays

It’s Still Not Easy Being Green

3 Sessions
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
March 4, 11, 18

In past talks our presenter has discussed the sustainability of the built environment, energy and water efficient ideas for the home, the economic and health benefits of being green, and the greening of America’s schools. In this class he expands on that foundation and continues with talks on: local green initiatives, zero-waste and a circular economy, and citizen advocacy for greener living. Current events and personal green habits will be shared at the beginning of each talk. Bring in your curiosities and your questions

Presenter: Brad Hochberg has recently held challenging positions as energy manager at Carnegie Mellon University, an institution of higher learning, and Pittsburgh Public Schools, a PreK-12th grade urban school district. Brad’s passion nowadays is greening schools.

FROM LIFELESS EARTH TO HUMAN MIND: SCIENCE AND RELIGION SEEK TO UNDERSTAND REALITY

4 sessions
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
March 25; April 1, 8, 22

This series of four talks will begin when our planet was born and consider how life and mind emerged in about four and a half billion years. We progress to human curiosity and how it raised questions about the world and our place in it, and how some of those questions led to religion. Thus, we examine Christian thought, and, since many think that science and religion are in conflict, we ask the question: must it always be so?

Presenter: Dr. Raymond Peckauskas, emeritus professor of physics at Sarah. Lawrence College, received his doctorate in biophysics from Cornell Medical School. We have had the good fortune to hear other stimulating lectures by this erudite scholar, including last fall’s course on Hawking: A Mind Roaming the Stars.

THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

4 sessions
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
March 4, 11, 18, 25

Join LIRIC member Bob Casey as he moderates a Great Courses series on The History of Medicine. Learn about Hippocrates and the origins of western medicine, Harvey and the discovery of circulation, the anatomy of disease, the surgeon as scientist, the origins of anesthesia, Lister and germ theory, American medical education, and the development of cardiac surgery.

Presenter: Bob Casey is a graduate of Iona, a businessman who, after many years in sales and marketing, became a partner in The Cake Crusader Dessert Distributor business. He has, however, had a lifelong interest in medical history, hospitals, doctors and research.

TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY

3 sessions
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
April 1, 8, 22

Once again we delve into the human mind. LIRIC member Sid Hecker starts us off on April 1 with a talk about The Psychology of Advertising. Then Dr. Robert Sussman gives us two talks about the art and science of psychiatry, discussing how a psychiatrist does what he does, and exploring further the intricacies of the human psyche.

PLAY - READING

7 sessions
2 - 3:15 p.m. (Class time may be extended at the discretion of the presenter.)
March 4, 11, 18, 25; April 1, 8, 22

Old, new, comedy, drama, “the play’s the thing.” You’re welcome to join our group to read selected plays aloud, or simply to listen if that’s what you prefer. The first play we’ll read is Molière’s A School for Husbands. Scripts will be provided, as they will be for the additional plays which will be announced in the spring.

Presenter: Lila Ogman, one of the founding members of LIRIC, who has been a member of the play-reading class since its inception.

ART WORKSHOP

7 sessions
2 - 3:15 p.m. (Class time may be extended at the discretion of the presenter.)
March 4, 11, 18, 25; April 1, 8, 22

In spite of the wide range of ability and experience among participants, each person is encouraged to develop his or her own style. All proceed at a comfortable pace, while learning the fundamentals of composition, design, color and painting techniques. Even if you have never painted, but have always wanted to try, you will find satisfaction and pleasure in this creative experience. Bring your own materials to the first class. If you have questions, contact the instructor, Louise Stern, at (914) 793-6652.

Instructor: Louise Stern has studied art in university settings as well as with known artists. She is listed in Who’s Who in American Art and is well-represented in corporate art collections at Pfizer Pharmaceuticals and General Foods, among others. She studied at MOMA’s Peoples Institute with Don Stacy and is a member of Silvermine Guild of Artists (New Canaan, Conn.), the National Association of Women Artists and others.

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Tuesdays

Tai Chi

8 sessions
9 - 10 a.m.
March 5, 12, 19, 26; April 2, 9, 23, 30

Pre-registration and an additional non-refundable fee of $65 are required for this class. We must have a minimum of 13 students registered by February 16 for the class to run.

Tai chi, as it is practiced in the west today, can perhaps best be thought of as a moving form of yoga and meditation combined. In Chinese philosophy and medicine, “chi” is a vital force that animates the body; thus one purpose of tai chi is to enhance the health and vitality of the practitioner. Tai chi also fosters a calm and tranquil mind by focusing on the precise execution of the exercises. Learning to do them correctly provides a practical method for improving balance, posture, alignment, fine-scale motor control, rhythm of movement, and breathing. Tai chi has been recommended as an adjunct therapy for chronic pain, arthritis, insomnia, asthma, high blood pressure, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and fibromyalgia.

Instructor: Domingo Colon is the owner of the Tai Chi School of Westchester in Bronxville. He has been practicing tai chi since he was 15 years old, and is the teacher of other tai chi masters as well as a frequent judge at tai chi competitions.

Writer’s Workshop

7 sessions
9 - 10:15 a.m.
March 12, 19, 26; April 2, 9, 23, 30

Note: Class begins March 12.

All of us have a vast number of stories and experiences within us just waiting to be heard. Here is your chance to release your hidden Hemingway and Tolstoy as the class explores a variety of writing experiences in a relaxed informal setting.

Facilitator: Chuck Miller enjoys writing and is excited about the opportunity to share that joy with others who share the passion. An educator for 48 years, as well as editor of last year’s LIRIC newsletter, The Happening, Chuck’s goal is to encourage each participant’s writing aspirations.

BIOETHICAL ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY

4 sessions
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
March 5, 12, 19, 26

Modern use of technology has presented many ethical dilemmas that will often require us to make decisions based on our moral and ethical values. These lectures will present a systematic, rational way to work through dilemmas and determine the best course of action in the face of conflicting choices. The course will examine bioethical principles and explore recent cases (e.g.: genealogy and crime solving, CRISPR and designer babies) and investigate the ethical dilemma involved in the use of the thalidomide drug and other historical cases.

Presenter: Joyce Kent is the retired chairperson of Science at New Rochelle High School where she introduced a course on Bioethics. Her class at LIRIC on bioethical issues has become a spring tradition. Joyce serves as Chair of the Curriculum Committee’s sub-committee on Science and Technology in addition to arranging field trips to the planetarium.

THE KINGS BETWEEN TWO QUEENS

4 sessions
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
April 2, 9, 23, 30

While many know about the lives of Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth II, the two longest reigning monarchs in British history, few know about the four kings who ruled during the years between them. This course attempts to correct that imbalance. We begin with Edward VII who despite being considered a playboy in his youth, ultimately became the European peacemaker of his time. We follow with George V whose difficult decisions ensured the continuation of the monarchy. Next we discuss the brief reign of Edward VIII, which ended when he abdicated to marry an American divorcee. We conclude with George VI, who assumed the throne reluctantly but was admired for his courage and fortitude during WWII.

Presenter: Rick Leibert, a retired adjunct professor of marketing at Iona College, is an educator at the Holocaust Museum and Study Center at Rockland Community College and a course leader at Collegium at Westchester Community College. Since becoming involved with LIRIC, he has led book discussions and given us courses or talks on the Holocaust, sports, orphan trains in America, Russia, and Queen Victoria.

BUILT: THE INFRASTRUCTURE

4 sessions
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
March 5, 12, 19, 26

Earth, wind, fire, and water are the elements that must be considered when building any structure – skyscraper, bridge, tunnel. This series of talks will show how structural engineers dealt with these forces of nature in the past and how they deal with them today. (No math needed!)

Presenter: Shirley Radcliffe, one of our most popular presenters, taught in the New York City public school system for 38 years, and after retirement at Manhattanville College. Here at LIRIC she has offered classes on literature, language, dining, clothes, the year 1491, and most recently mythology. She chairs the Humanities Committee.

THINKING ABOUT CULTURE

4 sessions
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
April 2, 9, 23, 30

Laypeople and scholars use the term culture to refer to everything from the “high” culture of art to the “way of life” within an ethnic group or nation, from the beliefs and symbols characterizing groups (youth, artists) and organizations (corporations, schools) to ethnic styles in food, music, and speech. This course will explore distinctive uses of the concept of culture, both scholarly and everyday. We will ask questions like: When we travel, what are we seeing when we see “cultural difference”? Does culture determine the way people think and act, or does it allow for individuality and resistance? How is globalization affecting the relations among cultures? How has the Internet changed or created cultures? Participants may learn to see their own lives through the lenses of different conceptions of culture – and to be a little more intentional in using that word.

Presenter: David Moore, an educational anthropologist with a doctorate from Harvard, was on the faculty of NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study for 33 years, where he taught courses on things like learning from experience, the meaning of work, and everyday life; he served as dean of academic and student affairs for nearly six years. Last spring, he offered the LIRIC course on The Search for Community.

TUESDAYS@TWO

5 sessions
2 - 3:15 p.m.
March 5, 12, 19, 26; April 2

Tuesdays are long days for LIRIC members who start at 9:00 a.m. with Tai Chi or the Writer’s Workshop, but don’t miss out on the wonderful programs we’ve scheduled at the end of the day! They’re geared for effortless learning, easy listening, and pure pleasure. They include:

  • Book Talks – and no, you need not have read the books! The presenters will be sharing about works they like in the hope you’ll pick them up one day when you have the time.
    • March 5
      The Golden Age of Mystery: The 1920s and 1930s Presenter: Jo-Anne Weinberg, Librarian
    • March 12
      The Ghost Stories of Edith Wharton and Mary Wilkins Freeman Presenter: Michael Sacks, Iona College English Department
  • The Lotus Flower Workshop.
    • March 19
      If you liked the centerpieces at the Winter Luncheon, you’ll want to get into this class. Pre-registration is required, along with a $5 charge for materials. Send in the registration form enclosed with the catalog by February 13. Since we can only take 30 people, preference will be given to those who were closed out of the fall workshop – as long as they meet the deadline!
  • Love and Opera
    • March 26; april 2
      • Joan Mallory, former head of Nyack College’s Music Education Department, makes an encore appearance at LIRIC to discuss Verdi’s La Traviata and Bizet’s Carmen, complete with operatic highlights.

CLASSICAL MUSIC 101

3 sessions
2 - 3:15 p.m.
April 9, 23, 30

Our second series begins with an explosion – the musical upheavals brought about by the innovations of Ludwig van Beethoven – and follows the unfolding of the Romantic movement through the compositions of Schubert, Chopin, and Brahms. The material is again based on So I’ve Heard, a comprehensive history of classical music (with copious musical selections) by the late Alan Rich, former classical music critic of the New York Times.

Presenter: Gregory Koster has been a Classical Music fan since the early 60s, and has attended as many classical concerts, ballets and operas as jazz performances.

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Wednesdays

Special Events at LIRIC

Wednesdays are special at LIRIC. Classes are suspended that day to allow for additional intellectual and artistic pursuits off site. The familiar is intertwined with the new in often off-beat adventures. The goal is to expose our members to things and places that enrich and feed the mind as well as the soul. Space is limited, so LIRIC members receive first priority. While information about our trips is generally sent in separate mailings, you will find the registration form for our March trip – a bus tour of New Rochelle with city historian Barbara Davis – enclosed with this catalog.

Trip planner Dianne Heim likes to travel far and near. With so many things to see in the world, Dianne would like to share with you some of those in our own backyard.

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Thursdays

ART IN THE ABSTRACT

8 sessions
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
March 7, 14, 21, 28; April 4, 11, 25; May 2

Experimented with representational painting and drawing (or afraid to)? Now add something different to your repertoire, or try it for the first time – mixed media or assemblage art! Discover how to use color, composition, shape and design fundamentals to develop your personal style. You can create an abstract artwork, using mixed media, such as a collage, or an assemblage piece, using found objects from everyday life or from personal collections.

No supplies are needed for the first class, and everyone is welcome, including absolute beginners.

Instructor: Eileen Allen has a BA in Fine Art and an MA in Art Education. She worked creatively in the business world in addition to teaching high school art.

GREAT DECISIONS

8 sessions
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
March 7, 14, 21, 28; April 4, 11, 25; May 2

Coordinated by LIRIC member Chris McCormick, with sessions hosted by Jim O’Neill, Great Decisions is a course sponsored by the Foreign Policy Association that encourages people to learn about and discuss U.S. foreign policy. Each session includes a 30-minute DVD for background and then a discussion led by LIRIC members and outside guests. Although it is not required, participants who wish to get the most from the course should purchase a copy of the Great Decisions Briefing Book ($32 + $5.16 shipping) and do the readings for each class. Copies may be ordered directly from The Foreign Policy Association by calling (800) 477-5836 between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or by ordering online at www.greatdecisions.org.

  • March 7
    • Refugees and Global Migration
      Presenter: Lois Lovisolo
  • March 14
    • Decoding U.S. – China Trade
      Presenter: Mohammed Saleem
  • March 21
    • Nuclear Negotiations: Back to the Future?
      Presenter: Mel Radner
  • March 28
    • The Middle East Regional Disorder
      Presenter: Naomi Eliezer
  • April 4
    • The Rise of Populism in Europe
      Presenter: Roseanne Klein
  • April 11
    • Cyber Conflicts and Geopolitics
      Presenter: Lewis Koflowitz
  • April 25
    • The United States and Mexico: Partnership Tested
      Presenter: Ernie Odierna
  • May 2
    • State of the State Department and Diplomacy
      Presenter: Joe Lechowicz

SPRING SALMAGUNDI

6 sessions
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
March 7, 14, 21, 28; April 4, 25

Join us for this series of six totally unrelated and thoroughly engaging talks.

  • March 7
    • An Introduction to Bitcoin and Blackchain
      Presenter: Kobie Thakar
  • March 14
    • Greek Immigration to the U.S.
      Presenter: Father Nick Anctil, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church
  • March 21
    • Handling Stress
      Presenter: Barbara Jorrisch
  • March 28
    • The Lunar Module: Engineering, Design, Success
      Presenter: Lois Lovisolo
  • April 4
    • The Ecumenical Implications of the Second Vatican Council
      Presenter: Dr. John Mahon, Professor Emeritus, Iona College
  • April 25
    • Jerusalem Before David
      Presenter: Peter Feinman, Founder and President, Institute of History, Archaeology and Education

DRAWING AND MORE

6 sessions
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
March 7, 14, 21, 28; April 4, 25

Like to draw? Dream of taking your stick figures to the next level? Here’s where to start. We’ll cover the basics of design, contour, shading and composition – with in-depth demos to help you draw various types of objects – and have fun while bringing out the artist in you. Newcomers are welcome, as are returning students. No experience or talent necessary – just the desire to learn. Please bring an 11x14 sketch pad, a 2B pencil and a kneaded or white vinyl (Magic Rub) eraser to the first class, where you’ll receive a complete supply list. (You may add color if you wish.) Questions? Call Gail at (914) 961-5661.

Presenter: Gail Apfel graduated from New York City’s High School of Music and Art then studied art at Buffalo State College and the Westchester Art Workshop. She taught photography and Arts and Crafts at summer camps for years and worked as a designer of custom framing as a sideline while teaching at the high school level in Westchester. Gail chairs our Fine and Performing Arts Committee.

LITERARY DISCUSSION

6 sessions
12:30 - 1:45 p.m.
March 7, 14, 21, 28; April 4, 25

The works chosen for the class this semester all reflect the theme of our Friday lecture series, Coming to America! In memoir, novel, short story and essay form, they describe the experience of immigrants coming to the United States. We’ve put the longest work first; it’s almost 600 pages but well worth the read. We do, however, suggest you get a copy as soon as you receive your catalog! Short works (March 14 and April 4) will be distributed in class the week before they are to be discussed.

  • March 7
    • Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
      Presenter: Linda Whetzel
  • March 14
    • Selected Short Stories by Ha Jin from his collection The Good Fall
      Presenter: Jeanne de Saint Ouen
  • March 21
    • The Fortunate Pilgrim, by Mario Puzo
      Presenter: Teddi Cerino
  • March 28
    • When I Was Puerto Rican, by Esmeralda Santiago
      Presenter: Linda Whetzel
  • April 4
    • Selected Essays from The Displaced, edited by Viet Thanh Nguyen
      Presenter: Beth Hofstetter
  • April 25
    • The Distance Between Us, by Reyna Grande
      Presenter: Viviane Ponslet

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Fridays

LECTURE SERIES: COMING TO AMERICA!

8 sessions
1 - 2:15 p.m.
March 1, 8, 15, 29; April 5, 12, 26; May 3
NOTE: the lectures on April 12 and May 3 will be in Romita Auditorium in Ryan Library.
All other lectures are in the Christopher J. Murphy Auditorium.

This series examines the history of immigration – and immigration law – from the earliest days to the present, and looks not only at the immigration experience, but at the contributions of the various immigrant groups to the culture and social life of the United States.

  • March 1
    • The History of Immigration: An Overview
      Presenter: Professor James Carroll, Iona College, History Department
  • March 8
    • The Irish Immigrant Experience
      Presenter: Professor Paul O’Connell, Iona College, Criminal Justice and Sociology Department
  • March 15
    • The Italian Immigrant Experience
      Presenter: Professor Emeritus William Egelman, Iona College, Criminal Justice and Sociology Department
  • No class March 22
  • March 29
    • “I like to be in América?”: Colonialism and Puerto Rico
      Presenter: Professor Teresa Delgado, Chair, Iona College, Religious Studies Department
  • April 5
    • The Economics of Migration
      Presenter: Professor Bonu Sengupta, Chair, Iona College, Economics Department
  • April 12
    • Forced Migration
      Presenter: Linda Creary
  • No class April 19
  • April 26
    • Immigration and the Tapestry of American Music
      Presenter: Dr. Patricia E. Smith, Music Program Director, Iona College
  • May 3
    • Stories from We, the People
      Presenters: Iona College Students

Class Representatives: Linda Creary

FILM COURSE: STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND

8 sessions
2:30 - 4:45 p.m.
March 1, 8, 15, 29; April 5, 12, 26; May 3
All classes will be held in Romita Auditorium in Ryan Library.

All classes meet in Romita Auditorium in Ryan Library

Immigration is a hot topic today. Some laud it for its humanitarian goals; others vilify it as an economic threat to the native worker. Headlines pander to both sides of the immigration issue. As outsiders, immigrants are often met with hostility and prejudice and can be easily exploited and quickly disheartened. Cultural and language differences create an array of social and economic difficulties. Regardless of the who, the when, the where, and the why, immigrants quickly learn that it’s difficult to be a “stranger in a strange land.”

  • March 1
    • America, America, 1963, Elia Kazan, director
  • March 8
    • El Norte, 1983, Gregory Nava, director
  • March 15
    • The Immigrant, 2013, James Gray, director
  • March 29
    • Samba 2015, Olivier Nakache & Eric Toledano, writers/directors
  • April 5
    • Hester Street, 1975, Joan Mickline Silver, director
  • April 12
    • In America, 2003, Jim Sheridan, director
  • April 26
    • A Better Life, 2011, Chris Weitz, director
  • May 3
    • Avalon, 1990, Barry Levinson, director

Instructor: Cheryl Passavanti is a learning facilitator and lecturer on current topics about and through film. A frequenter of film festivals and film clubs, she has brought her expertise to the New Rochelle Staff Resource Center, the Adult Education program in New Rochelle, and, in the last few years, to LIRIC.

Class Representative: Lorraine Rosado

EVERYDAY EXCEL, Part 2

6 sessions
2:30 - 4 p.m.
March 15, 29; April 5, 12, 26; May 3
Class meets in Murphy Computer Lab Room 122

Note that classes begin on Friday, March 15.
You must register for this course by February 13.
Excel is a spreadsheet program that can be used for personal budgeting, monthly expenses, or processing and organizing information.

Topics for Everyday Excel Part 2 will include:

  • Reviewing Excel Part 1 – the Excel Interface including Menus, Ribbons, Cell Formats, Creating, Saving and Retrieving documents
  • Continue with our “Keeping Track of Personal Expenses” project
  • Organizing your work with AutoCorrect, Naming Ranges, Add comments, and Using Text Boxes
  • Various Printing Features such as Page Breaks, Headers and Footers, Print Are, and Print Titles
  • As time permits, we will continue with Formulas and Functions and Sorting and Filtering data

Student Requirements:

  1. Working knowledge of windows for PCs
  2. Working email account
  3. Must bring a USB flash drive to every class to save work.

Students must register for this class by February 13. No students will be admitted to class unless they are confirmed through LIRIC. If you have questions about registration, please contact LIRIC’s director, Suzanne Page, at spage@iona.edu

Instructors: Diana Breen, former manager of the Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching at Iona College (CELTIC), has a BS in Computer Science and a MA in English. She has developed software for IBM and has been an independent hardware/software consultant, a high school teacher and a technology coordinator.

Anna Martone has been an independent computer consultant for over 20 years. Anna has developed training materials and documentation that have been used in various training programs. Her varied clients include government entities, local colleges, and some of the top financial institutions.

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