The Age of Revolutions in the Digital Age

Virtual Workshop Overview

Thank you for participating in the workshop for “The Age of Revolutions in the Digital Age”! Here is the schedule and structure of the two day workshop, which will now be conducted via Zoom Webinar. This also includes the framework of your group, the different projects, and participants. Please let us – Mark, Nora, and Ben – know if you have any questions, or if there are any additional accommodations (technological, family care, or any other form) we can assist with.

Details and Deadlines

Please submit your 5,000-6,000 word papers by August 24, 2020. All papers will be available to other participants via a secure shared drive, and we will use this draft to provide feedback regarding possible inclusion in the Cornell University Press volume. Please budget time between late August and the symposium to read and prepare thoughts on the papers of your session-mates and any others that interest you.

The event will begin with sessions Friday, September 11, 2020 and conclude Saturday, September 12, 2020. Many of you have already received your honorarium, and we hope those funds will help ensure your availability for these two days. Of course, family and work obligations are changing rapidly and we understand that you may not be able to participate in every session. We will ask you to join for your session as well as at least two others of your choosing to ensure that all of the papers receive sufficient attention and engagement.

  • Mark, Nora, and Ben share a brief overview of the background of the project and goals for moving forward.
  • Brief comments from Michael McGandy of Cornell University Press.

Schedule

Friday, September 11, 2020

9-11 a.m. ET -  Session One/Group One: Mapping Revolutions

  • Molly Nebiolo, “Visualizing Urban Space During the Age of Revolutions: Considerations and Realities of Digitally Mapping the Past”
  • Jessica Parr, “Geographies of Emancipation: Geospatial Technology in Mapping Black Thought in the Age of Revolution”
  • Cameron Shriver, “Mapping Myaamia Landownership, 1795-1846”

11:15 a.m. - 1:15 p.m. - Session Two/Group Six: The Digital Present and Revolutionary Pasts

  • Joseph M. Adelman, “'A busy, bustling, disputatious tone:' News Anxiety in the Age of Revolutions and Today”
  • Katlyn Carter, “Recording Revolutions: Stenography and Trust in the Eighteenth-Century”
  • Kyle Courtney, Title Forthcoming
  • Jordan Taylor, “Media Literacy in the Age of Revolutions”

Lunch break

2:15 - 4:15 p.m. – Session Three/Group Five: Coding Revolutions  

  • Jean Bauer, “Can a Committee Keep a Secret? Social Network Analysis, Treason, and the Second Continental Congress, 1775-1776”  
  • Gary Berton, Michael Crowder, Lubomir Ivanov, and Smiljana Petrovic, “The Text Attribution Project”  
  • Maeve Kane, “By Conversation with a Lady: Women's Correspondence Networks in the Founders Online Database”

4:30 - 6 p.m. – Session Four/Group Three: Digital Publics 

  • Lindsay Chervinsky and Whitney Stewart, “Digital Public History and the Recreation of Presidential Spaces”  
  • Marcus Nevius, “Finding a “City of Refuges” in the Archives of the Age of Revolution, Or, At Least Those of North America’s Great Dismal Swamp”

Saturday, September 12, 2020

10 a.m. - Noon – Session Five/Group Four: Digital Analysis of Revolutionary Rhetoric

  • Carolyn Eastman, “Bringing the Elocution Revolution to Life”  
  • Barry Goldberg, ““The Things That Paine Stood For”: The Thomas Paine National Historical Association Looks Back on the Age of Revolutions”  
  • Brad Rittenhouse, Title Forthcoming

Lunch break

1 - 3 p.m. - Session Six/Group Two: Data and Databases

  • Sara Collini, “Revolutionary Labors: Creating a Relational Database to Explore Enslaved Midwives’ Work in Early America”
  • Christy Potroff and Taylor Galusha, “Newport’s Revolutionary Infrastructure”
  • Kyle Roberts and Benjamin Bankhurst, “New Media and Old Problems: Restoring Humanity in The Maryland Loyalism Project”

4 - 5 p.m. - Concluding Happy Hour (optional)
Bring a beverage of your choice and join us for an informal hang out at the end of the workshop!

Working Groups

Group One: Mapping Revolutions

  • Molly Nebiolo, “Visualizing Urban Space During the Age of Revolutions: Considerations and Realities of Digitally Mapping the Past”
  • Jessica Parr, “Geographies of Emancipation: Geospatial Technology in Mapping Black Thought in the Age of Revolution”
  • Cameron Shriver, “Mapping Myaamia Landownership, 1795-1846”

Group Two: Data and Databases

  • Sara Collini, “Revolutionary Labors: Creating a Relational Database to Explore Enslaved Midwives’ Work in Early America”
  • Christy Potroff and Taylor Galusha, “Newport’s Revolutionary Infrastructure”
  • Kyle Roberts and Benjamin Bankhurst, “New Media and Old Problems: Restoring Humanity in The Maryland Loyalism Project”

Group Three: Digital Publics

  • Lindsay Chervinsky and Whitney Stewart, “Digital Public History and the Recreation of Presidential Spaces”
  • Marcus Nevius, “Finding a "City of Refuge" in the Archives of the Age of Revolution, Or, At Least Those of North America's Great Dismal Swamp”

Group Four: Digital Analysis of Revolutionary Rhetoric

  • Carolyn Eastman, “Bringing the Elocution Revolution to Life”
  • Barry Goldberg, ““The Things That Paine Stood For”: The Thomas Paine National Historical Association Looks Back on the Age of Revolutions”
  • Brad Rittenhouse, Title Forthcoming

Group Five: Coding Revolutions

  • Jean Bauer, “Can a Committee Keep a Secret?: Social Network Analysis, Treason, and the Second Continental Congress, 1775-1776”
  • Gary Berton, Michael Crowder, Lubomir Ivanov, and Smiljana Petrovic, “The Text Attribution Project”
  • Maeve Kane, “By Conversation with a Lady: Women's Correspondence Networks in the Founders Online Database”

Group Six: The Digital Present and Revolutionary Pasts

  • Joseph M. Adelman, “'A busy, bustling, disputatious tone:'” News Anxiety in the Age of Revolutions and Today”
  • Katlyn Carter, “Recording Revolutions: Stenography and Trust in the Eighteenth-Century”
  • Kyle Courtney, Title Forthcoming
  • Jordan Taylor, “Media Literacy in the Age of Revolutions"