Skip navigation

Mathematics and Physics Department

“Give me a place to stand and I will move the world.”  – Archimedes

Iona’s mathematics programs will prepare you to make an impact in some of today’s most challenging fields – and move your own career forward in the direction that interests you.

In addition to gaining a solid foundation in mathematical methods and techniques, you will develop the logical and analytical thinking skills that will enable you to become a valued problem-solver within a broad range of industries.

Iona’s mathematics curriculum emphasizes the three major fields of study, algebra, analysis and applied mathematics, while giving you the chance to delve more deeply into an area of personal interest.

Understand the forces that move the world.

Iona’s physics programs will prepare you to use the tools of science to expand your knowledge of nature and the forces that impact life on Earth. Through theory and experimentation, mathematics and computer science, you will gain a solid foundation in the principles and practice of both classical and modern physics. You will learn to use your scientific skills as a force for good, advancing leadership, service and civic responsibility.

The physics major provides you with a firm grounding in the principle fields of classical physics: mechanics, heat, light, electricity and magnetism. You’ll also gain an understanding of the elements of modern physics: relativity, quantum theory, particle physics and thermodynamics.

Whether you choose to go further in the sciences or apply your skills in other fields, you will graduate with the critical thinking skills and scientific discipline to succeed in many different areas.

Clare Boothe Luce Program

Henry Luce Foundation logo
Since its first grants in 1989, the Clare Boothe Luce Program (CBL) has become the single most significant source of private support for women in science, mathematics and engineering. Clare Boothe Luce, the widow of Henry R. Luce, was a playwright, journalist, U.S. Ambassador to Italy, and the first woman elected to Congress from Connecticut. In her bequest establishing this program, she sought "to encourage women to enter, study, graduate, and teach” in science, mathematics and engineering." See more information on the national program.