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Current Studies

Social Media Use and Well-Being Among Adolescents

Over the past decade, social media use amongst adolescents has been changing at a rapid pace. Looking at the average American 12th grader, a national study found that in 2008 about 52% reported visiting social media sites almost daily. In 2016, that number rose to 82% (Twenge, Martin, & Spitzberg, 2018). With this increased and ever-changing use of social media amongst adolescents, it is important that research is focused on the possible positive and negative aspects of social media use.

The goal of the current study is to create a survey to measure adolescent social media use in more depth, and to build upon our knowledge of both the “good” and “bad” aspects of social media use. We have created a new assessment tool, the Comprehensive Assessment of Social Media Use for Adolescents (CASM-A), a self-report measure that assesses different aspects of adolescent social media use. One goal of this study is to assess various psychometric properties of the CASM-A, including face validity, discriminant validity, construct validity and reliability. Additionally, we will assess various indicators of well-being (including stress, depression, anxiety, exercise, social interaction, social comparison, sleep quality) among our participants so that we can examine correlations between the various subscales of the CASM-A and these factors.

We are currently looking for participants to join our study! If you have a son or daughter between the ages of 12 and 17, they are invited to participate. This study is an online survey which takes approximately 30-40 minutes to complete. If you are interested in having your child participate, click on the link below and you will be taken to the survey. Before beginning the study please note:

  • Once you click on the "Join the Study" button, you will be immediately taken to the survey.
  • This survey takes approximately 30-40 minutes to complete, and must be completed in one sitting.
  • This survey is anonymous, and no identifiable data will be linked to you or your child.
If you are ready to proceed and participate in the study now, please click the “Join the Study” button. If you want to wait until a more convenient time, return to this page and click the button when ready.

 


Social Media Use and Well-Being Among Emerging Adults

Technology is changing our lives: however, if that change is more for the better or the worse is yet unclear. One area of immense growth over the past several years pertains to the use of social media. Research indicates that approximately 65% of American adults and 90% of young adults use some form of social media, i.e. an internet platform that involves the exchange and creation of user-generated content, at least daily. A good deal of research exists that links frequency of use of social media with negative factors, including increased depression, loneliness, and suicide related outcomes (see Twenge et al., 2018 for a comprehensive study evaluating such links). However, research also indicates that people who do not use social media at all may be more lonely and unhappy than their peers. It is clear that a more nuanced understanding of social media and its uses is needed to better uncover the complex relationships between technology use and well-being.

The goal of this study is to build upon our knowledge of both the “good” and “bad” aspects of social media use among emerging adults. We created a new assessment tool, the Comprehensive Assessment of Social Media Use (CASM), a self-report measure that assesses many aspects of social media use, including addictive qualities, motivations for use, use as coping mechanisms, and use for positive efforts. One goal of this study is to assess various psychometric properties of the CASM, including face validity, convergent validity and reliability. Additionally, we are assessing indicators of well-being (including stress, depression, anxiety, self-injury, emotional regulation, exercise, social interaction, GPA) among our participants so that we can examine correlations between the various subscales of the CASM and these factors.