Service-Learning

Apply what you've learned in the classroom as you help your community tackle real-life issues.

What is Service-Learning?

Service-learning is much more than community service. These for-credit courses have three main components: academic coursework, a project with a community partner, and reflection.

We want you to leave Iona ready to take on the world — in your own life and career, but also on behalf of others. Service-learning courses show you how academic knowledge can be applied in unexpected ways. You'll also find there are some things you can only learn outside of the classroom.

You might spend time with Haitian refugees in the Dominican Republic, look at how environmental justice and animal protection intersect at a sanctuary in Utah, or learn how dance can help a community tell its stories. As the world changes, our service-learning offerings grow and evolve to best serve our partners and our students.

Academic Content

Service-learning can be incorporated into courses at any level, from any academic discipline — from “Introduction to Public Relations" to "International Relations" to “Contemporary Peacemakers in India.”

Your service-learning instructor prepares content — readings, lectures, group activities, research assignments — to get you ready to collaborate with your designated community partners.

Fulfilling Community-Identified Needs

You’ll partner with nonprofit organizations, government agencies and social service groups on specific projects serving needs identified by the organizations and the communities they serve.

Our relationships with community partners are designed to be reciprocal, not one-sided. You're not just helping an organization in need, you're gaining valuable experience. They're not just getting volunteer assistance, they're putting effort into learning with you and sharing their expertise.

Intentional Reflection

Reflection is the key third piece of service-learning that helps bring it all together. We’ll ask you to think meaningfully about your experience — through writing, discussion, presentations, even artistic expressions. These reflections reinforce what you've learned and help you develop a deeper understanding of complex social issues.

Learn More About Service-Learning

Service-learning has provided my students greater self-awareness and insight as they step out of their comfort zones and ask questions they have never explored. It provides a context and an opportunity to further explore the causes of systemic injustice.

Dr. Carl Procario-Foley, Director of the Office of Mission and Ministry

Community Partners

Previous service-learning community partners include:

  • New Rochelle Public Library
  • Big Viv’s Toy Drive
  • Camp Viva
  • Crossroads (Dominican Republic)
  • Meals-on-Wheels
  • Office for the Aging
  • My Brother's Keeper
  • Lincoln Park Community Garden
  • My Sisters' Place
  • Hope Community Services

Interested in becoming a community partner?
Information for Organizations

A Christian Brothers Education

Service-learning directly addresses the idea that a Christian Brothers education “stands in solidarity with those marginalized by poverty and injustice.”

Contact Us

Dayna Richardson

Coordinator for Civic & Global Engagement